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Is the NHS ‘soup and shake’ type 2 diabetes diet really the solution for we’ve been waiting for?

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June Davidson was deservedly proud of her achievement after following an extreme diet that put her type 2 diabetes into remission.

The groundbreaking slimming plan, developed by a team at Newcastle University, involves consuming just 800 calories a day for up to four months in order to lose between 22lb and 33lb (10kg to 15kg) – enough, experts say, for most people to reverse the condition.

Also known as the ‘soups and shakes’ diet – because meals are replaced with low-calorie liquid variants – it is being offered on the NHS after trials found it could help curb the nation’s escalating type 2 diabetes crisis. And the need is clear. The blood sugar condition, which dramatically increases the risk of heart attacks, kidney failure, stroke, amputations and blindness, affects more than five million people and costs the NHS £10 billion a year.

Anti-diabetes drugs alone cost £746 million in 2021/22, up from £423 million in 2015/16. If trends continue, one in ten adults will suffer from diabetes by the end of the decade.

For June, from Crowthorne, Berkshire, who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2018, the results were extraordinary – at least at first.

DISHEARTENED: Lynne Lewis regained the weight she lost on the low-calorie diet after her husband's death

DISHEARTENED: Lynne Lewis regained the weight she lost on the low-calorie diet after her husband's death

DISHEARTENED: Lynne Lewis regained the weight she lost on the low-calorie diet after her husband’s death

The 'soups and shakes' diet ¿ where meals are replaced with low-calorie liquid variants ¿ is being offered on the NHS after trials found it could help curb the nation's escalating type 2 diabetes crisis

The 'soups and shakes' diet ¿ where meals are replaced with low-calorie liquid variants ¿ is being offered on the NHS after trials found it could help curb the nation's escalating type 2 diabetes crisis

The ‘soups and shakes’ diet – where meals are replaced with low-calorie liquid variants – is being offered on the NHS after trials found it could help curb the nation’s escalating type 2 diabetes crisis

The 86-year-old lost 20 per cent of her bodyweight, dropping from 13st (83kg) to under ten (64kg).

Four months of 800 calories a day were far from easy. June recalled being ‘always hungry’, except for an hour after every shake, and occasionally having a lettuce leaf or small stick of celery to curb her stomach pangs.

What kept her going was focusing on what really mattered – being free of diabetes and off medication at the end of it all.

And when she managed it, she felt euphoric. Her blood sugar levels, which had been ‘very high’, fell so significantly that her GP stopped prescribing her daily dose of type 2 diabetes drug metformin.

With the weight off, she felt ‘healthier than ever,’ taking daily walks and playing golf.

But today, three years on, things are not quite so rosy.

June is now heavier than she was before she started the diet – at more than 14st (89kg). And last month, with her blood sugar creeping dangerously high again, her GP put her back on metformin.

‘I’m so cross with myself,’ said June, who worked as a personal assistant at a pharmaceutical firm before retiring. ‘I relaxed once I lost the weight, so went back to what I was doing all the time – eating out.

‘I don’t have an unhealthy diet – I have a family history of obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease, so I eat porridge for breakfast, lots of salads and fish. I don’t even eat cakes or biscuits. But bread is my downfall. Now I have to try to lose the weight again. It’s maddening.’

Lynne Lewis with her husband Thomas John Lewis in around 2012

Lynne Lewis with her husband Thomas John Lewis in around 2012

Lynne Lewis with her husband Thomas John Lewis in around 2012

Lynne Lewis holding a picture of her wedding in 1976, at her house is Pentwyn near Pontypool, Wales

Lynne Lewis holding a picture of her wedding in 1976, at her house is Pentwyn near Pontypool, Wales

Lynne Lewis holding a picture of her wedding in 1976, at her house is Pentwyn near Pontypool, Wales

June’s frustration is understandable – and something she no doubt shares with many others who had hoped the pioneering diet would rid them of type 2 diabetes for good.

Today, the ‘soups and shakes’ method is being rolled out across the UK, and everyone eligible – those aged 18 to 65 who have a body mass index (BMI) of more than 27 and have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes within the last six years – will be able to access it by March, the Government announced last month. It is currently available in 21 parts of England and more than 2,000 people have started treatment on the 12-month plan, which costs the NHS about £1,100 per patient.

IT’S A FACT

The charity Diabetes UK predicts that by 2030 the condition will cause more than 87,000 hospital admissions each year.

Those taking part are given a voucher code and log on details for a website where they can order meal replacement products including shakes, soups, porridge and meal bars – each containing 200 calories. The meals arrive to their home the following day.

Initially, the scheme involves weekly Zoom meetings with mentors and fellow participants, which become fortnightly after food is reintroduced and then monthly. The Government hopes tens of thousands of people could eventually benefit from it.

This high-level backing came after results from a groundbreaking clinical trial. It showed the rapid weight loss over the first few months with meal replacements, followed by a gradual return to a healthy diet and regular coaching sessions, could reverse the condition in ‘up to half’ of participants after a year.

The ongoing study, called Direct and funded by the charity Diabetes UK, is led by metabolic health expert Professor Roy Taylor at Newcastle University and dietician Professor Michael Lean at the University of Glasgow.

Last month it released further results which show some people remained free of diabetes even five years later – suggesting, according to Prof Taylor, that the benefits could be ‘permanent and lifelong’.

It’s an extraordinary achievement. But for all its successes, it is far from the magic bullet clinicians might have hoped for. As people such as June have found, it works only if weight loss is maintained.

That, for many, is the hardest part. But a significant number of people struggle to even get through the initial weight-loss phase.

Who is Geoff Whitington? 

BACK ON YOUR BIKE: Geoff Whitington's sons, Ian and Anthony, have twice helped him get into shape

BACK ON YOUR BIKE: Geoff Whitington's sons, Ian and Anthony, have twice helped him get into shape

BACK ON YOUR BIKE: Geoff Whitington’s sons, Ian and Anthony, have twice helped him get into shape

Geoff Whitington, the star of the heartwarming BBC documentary Fixing Dad, transformed his health – losing seven stone and putting his type 2 diabetes into remission – after his sons, Anthony and Ian, decided to overhaul his lifestyle in 2013.

Along with regular exercise, he stuck to an ultra-low 600-calorie-a-day diet, with the support of Direct trial chief Professor Roy Taylor.

But Geoff suffered a relapse when the Covid pandemic led to a resurgence of bad habits. Geoff, now 71, from Sevenoaks, Kent, put on two stone in lockdown and had to start taking blood sugar drug metformin again – five years after he reversed the condition.

He then developed sepsis in 2021 when routine checks on his foot ulcers – a complication of diabetes – were not made.

‘It was touch-and-go for a while,’ says Anthony. ‘He was in hospital, on a ward with people having amputations and dying.

‘But it was the shock he needed. He had been eating carbs and drinking alcohol. We had to fix him all over again.’ So Anthony, 45, and Ian, 43, put him back on a healthy diet and reduced his calories by getting him on just two meals a day.

Geoff is no longer taking metformin after his blood sugar returned to normal and has lost the weight he gained. Last month, he cycled 66 miles around Loch Ness with his sons.

Anthony says: ‘Dad struggled in the pandemic. But it shows that, with a bit of motivation, you can turn it around. A relapse doesn’t mean you’ve failed.’

An NHS pilot programme, which began in September 2020, found that 41 per cent of 1,087 people did not complete the plan.

Those who stuck it out lost an average of 2st (13kg) after three months – but put weight back on after introducing food again. At the 12-month mark, the average weight lost was 1st 11lb (11.4kg) – around ten per cent of their bodyweight.

NHS England has not yet released data on how many saw their diabetes reversed but expects to do so ‘within nine to 12 months’. But it may not match the Direct trial’s success. Weight loss of at least 2st 5lb (15kg) was required ‘by most people’ in order to reverse diabetes, the research suggested.

Susan Jebb, professor of diet and population health at the University of Oxford, sits on the advisory board for the NHS rollout but is also planning a trial to investigate other options for people who don’t benefit from the extreme diet.

She said the dropout rate was similar to other weight loss programmes and acknowledged that the results so far were not as good as the Direct trial.

‘Often when you take a treatment from carefully managed trials into what you might call routine practice, the results are worse,’ Prof Jebb said. ‘These results so far aren’t quite as good as the trials – you have to be honest about that – but they are still very good.

‘There are all sorts of reasons why that might be. People who sign up for trials are a particular kind of person – very committed and determined – and they get a lot of extra care, which affects the results.

‘In the real world, it’s different. We also have to acknowledge that lots of people who are eligible for the programme won’t want to take it up – this kind of diet is not going to be suitable for everyone. So we don’t yet know what the uptake might actually be.’

Richard Wilson, 66, said his group in Solihull, West Midlands, started with 20 participants in August 2022 and is now down to six. ‘Quite a few of my fellow participants were confessing that, after the initial weight-loss phase, they were really struggling and had gone off the diet for various reasons,’ he said.

The retired management consultant lost 3st 8lb (23kg) – 20 per cent of his bodyweight – after 12 weeks of soups and shakes, putting his diabetes into remission, but had regained 19lb (9kg) by April. For the past month, he’s been back on the diet.

Geoff Whitington, 62, holding a bike wheel aloft above his head

Geoff Whitington, 62, holding a bike wheel aloft above his head

Geoff Whitington, 62, holding a bike wheel aloft above his head

Geoff Whitington, 62, with his sons, Ian (left) and Anthony (right), in Shadoxhurst Kent

Geoff Whitington, 62, with his sons, Ian (left) and Anthony (right), in Shadoxhurst Kent

Geoff Whitington, 62, with his sons, Ian (left) and Anthony (right), in Shadoxhurst Kent

The problem, as patients are finding, is that keeping weight off in the long term is not easy.

Even in the Direct trial, the number of participants who remained in remission dropped over time. Of 149 patients enrolled at the start of the Direct trial in 2016, just over one third were still diabetes-free after two years.

Patients in the trial who put weight back on were offered a ‘reset’ option, which involved restarting the soups and shakes phase. They were also offered weight-loss drug orlistat.

During the two years of study, half of the participants needed a reset period, one in ten needed two periods and 5.6 per cent needed three. Despite this, the most recent data, announced earlier this year, showed just 11 of the 149 patients were still in remission.

Naveed Sattar, professor of metabolic medicine at the University of Glasgow, who is involved in the Direct study, acknowledged work has to be done to understand how to help more people for longer.

He said: ‘All options are on the table – drugs to curb appetite, more low-calorie diet phases, training or education – but at the moment we don’t know which might work best.

‘Anecdotally, I can tell you that those who managed to sustain their weight fundamentally changed their lifestyles, becoming more active and changing their diets completely.

‘But some people get sucked back into old habits, or their environment or family circumstances don’t allow the changes. We need to work out how we help those people too.’

Lynne Lewis, 70, from Pontypool in South Wales, regained weight – and her diabetes – after her husband’s death. She was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2009 and started the diet in 2015 after experiencing diabetes-related cataracts in her eyes and poor circulation in her toes, which can be a precursor to nerve damage and amputation.

But after eight weeks on the diet, her blood sugar had dropped. ‘I was a dress size 22 and I went down to a 12,’ she said. ‘I was able to come off metformin completely.’

After Lynne’s husband John died suddenly in November 2018, the weight crept back on.

‘The grief meant everything went out the window,’ she said. ‘I’m now a dress size 16, my blood sugar is high and I’m back on metformin.

‘If my husband hadn’t died, maybe I’d have managed to stick at it. But it’s completely my fault.’

Aside from bitter disappointment and self-blame, is the diet a cost-effective use of NHS money?

Prof Sattar believes so. The Direct trial found there were fewer heart attacks, strokes and other serious issues in the group given the diet and support, regardless of whether they achieved diabetes remission. ‘We focus on remission but what we also invoke [with this diet] is a period of time where people have less excess fat,’ Prof Sattar said.

‘For some of the chronic complications of diabetes, what matters is not the weight they reach but how long they’ve been at that weight.

‘The hope is that we delay or slow the complications for these people.’

Prof Jebb added: ‘Obesity is a chronic, relapsing condition. It’s not surprising you’re going to have to have another go [at dieting]. In an ideal world we would have one treatment to help you lose weight and one to help you keep it off.

‘We’ve got good at the first bit – but rubbish at the second.

‘Maybe we have to accept that the best thing people can do is attempt that acute phase of weight loss, not beat themselves up if they put it back on – and just try again.’

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🔴 Live: Deadly Israeli air strikes hit central Gaza, tanks increase bombardment in Rafah

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Israeli air strikes hit the Nuseirat refugee camp and the city of Deir al-Balah in central Gaza overnight on Thursday, killing at least three people and injuring more than a dozen others, according to health officials and medics. Israeli tanks in southern Gaza’s Rafah stepped up bombardment, forcing more people there to flee north. Follow our liveblog for the latest updates on the Israel-Hamas war.

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Professor Brian Cox warns that human spacecraft could soon be all that remains of ‘our increasingly dim-witted civilisation’ as he hails NASA’s fixed 47-year-old Voyager 1 probe – and says why we’re yet to hear from aliens

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Many scientists have a view on why we haven’t heard from aliens yet.  

Now, legendary English physicist Professor Brian Cox has shared a compelling new theory. 

In a typically witty post on X, Professor Cox said civilizations are ‘inevitably crushed shortly after inventing the internet’.

He also revealed he thinks ‘it won’t be long before our spacecraft are the only thing that remains of our increasingly dim-witted civilisation’. 

Professor Cox was being trolled after hailing NASA’s Voyager 1 probe, which is fully functioning for the first time since November.

In response to trolls on X, Professor Brian Cox has shared his newest theory about why we haven't heard from aliens

In response to trolls on X, Professor Brian Cox has shared his newest theory about why we haven't heard from aliens

In response to trolls on X, Professor Brian Cox has shared his newest theory about why we haven’t heard from aliens 

In a typically witty post on X, Professor Cox said civilizations are 'inevitably crushed shortly after inventing the internet'

In a typically witty post on X, Professor Cox said civilizations are 'inevitably crushed shortly after inventing the internet'

In a typically witty post on X, Professor Cox said civilizations are ‘inevitably crushed shortly after inventing the internet’ 

After NASA announced Voyager 1 had been fixed, Professor Cox posted: ‘It never ceases to amaze me that a spacecraft launched in 1977 can be fixed remotely from Earth.’

Someone replied: ‘Meanwhile, the printer that’s 3 feet from my laptop won’t connect.’ 

Another said: ‘Maybe the aliens kind enough to give it a jumpstart out there.’ 

Some conspiracy theorists joined in, with one saying ‘as if people actually believe this is real’. 

Taking to X again the academic then posted: ‘Honestly – a few of the replies to this little tribute to engineering excellence exhibit a level of stupidity that suggests to me that it won’t be long before our spacecraft are the only thing that remains of our increasingly dim-witted civilisation. 

Professor Cox also mentioned the Fermi Paradox – the apparent contradiction between the lack of evidence for extra-terrestrial civilizations and various high estimates for their probability. 

‘Until recently my guess has been that the answer to the Fermi Paradox might be found in biology – complex biological systems are rare,’ he said. 

‘I’m increasingly of the view that the reason for The Great Silence is that civilisations are inevitably crushed by the weight of n*****ds shortly after inventing the internet.’ 

'Maybe the aliens gave it a jumpstart?': Cox was humorously trolled for hailing the ageing Voyager 1 space probe

'Maybe the aliens gave it a jumpstart?': Cox was humorously trolled for hailing the ageing Voyager 1 space probe

‘Maybe the aliens gave it a jumpstart?’: Cox was humorously trolled for hailing the ageing Voyager 1 space probe

While Voyager 1 is more than 15 billion miles away from Earth, someone replied that 'the printer that's 3 feet from my laptop won't connect'

While Voyager 1 is more than 15 billion miles away from Earth, someone replied that 'the printer that's 3 feet from my laptop won't connect'

While Voyager 1 is more than 15 billion miles away from Earth, someone replied that ‘the printer that’s 3 feet from my laptop won’t connect’ 

'They switched it off and on again': Voyager 1 was launched in September 1977 and has been suffering technical glitches

'They switched it off and on again': Voyager 1 was launched in September 1977 and has been suffering technical glitches

‘They switched it off and on again’: Voyager 1 was launched in September 1977 and has been suffering technical glitches 

Professor Cox mentioned the Fermi Paradox - the apparent contradiction between the lack of evidence for extra-terrestrial civilizations and various high estimates for their probability (file photo)

Professor Cox mentioned the Fermi Paradox - the apparent contradiction between the lack of evidence for extra-terrestrial civilizations and various high estimates for their probability (file photo)

Professor Cox mentioned the Fermi Paradox – the apparent contradiction between the lack of evidence for extra-terrestrial civilizations and various high estimates for their probability (file photo)

What is Voyager 1?

No spacecraft has gone farther than NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft. 

Launched in 1977 to fly by Jupiter and Saturn, Voyager 1 crossed into interstellar space in August 2012 and continues to collect data.

The probe is now in interstellar space, the region outside the heliopause, or the bubble of energetic particles and magnetic fields from the sun.

Source: NASA 

Voyager 1 – the most distant human-made object in existence – has been sending back data from interstellar space for nearly 50 years after being launched in 1977. 

It is famous for returning one of the most revered astronomical images of all time – Pale Blue Dot, showing our planet as a spec of dust in the vastness of space.  

However, in November, a glitch occurred that made the spacecraft’s data about its environment and the health of its own systems unintelligible to the NASA scientists monitoring it.

The team partially resolved the issue in April when they prompted the spacecraft to begin returning engineering data, including information about the health and status of the spacecraft. 

The following month, two of its four science instruments were fixed after the team sent commands to it, more than 15 billion miles away. 

The two other instruments required some additional work, but now they are also returning usable science data, NASA said in a statement last week. 

Voyager 1 was the first human-made object to leave our solar system and enter the space between stars. Its identical twin, Voyager 2, is 12.6 billion miles (20 billion kilometers) away and is also still functional

Voyager 1 was the first human-made object to leave our solar system and enter the space between stars. Its identical twin, Voyager 2, is 12.6 billion miles (20 billion kilometers) away and is also still functional

Voyager 1 was the first human-made object to leave our solar system and enter the space between stars. Its identical twin, Voyager 2, is 12.6 billion miles (20 billion kilometers) away and is also still functional 

Voyager 1, the most distant spacecraft from Earth, stopped sending back understandable data in November 2023 but has been fixed

Voyager 1, the most distant spacecraft from Earth, stopped sending back understandable data in November 2023 but has been fixed

Voyager 1, the most distant spacecraft from Earth, stopped sending back understandable data in November 2023 but has been fixed 

Jupiter, taken from Voyager 1 at around 12 million miles (20 million kilometres) away in 1979

Jupiter, taken from Voyager 1 at around 12 million miles (20 million kilometres) away in 1979

Jupiter, taken from Voyager 1 at around 12 million miles (20 million kilometres) away in 1979

Voyager 1 is more than 15 billion miles away from Earth, while its sister probe Voyager 2 is more than 12 billion miles away. 

Both Voyagers launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida in 1977 – with Voyager 2 departing a month earlier than 1.

They were built to last five years but they have far exceeded that, having been travelling for 47 years as of this summer. 

Both spacecraft flew past Jupiter and Saturn, while Voyager 2 also flew past Uranus and Neptune.

THE BACKGROUND TO NASA’S HISTORIC VOYAGER MISSION

The Voyager spacecraft were built by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, which continues to operate both. 

NASA launched the Voyager 1 spacecraft on September 5 1977, and the Voyager 2 on August 20 1977.

Each spacecraft carries a golden record on board – a record that includes sounds, pictures and messages of Earth.

Continuing on their more than 37-year journey since their 1977 launches, they each are much farther away from Earth and the sun than Pluto. 

In August 2012, Voyager 1 made the historic entry into interstellar space, the region between stars, filled with material ejected by the death of nearby stars millions of years ago. 

Humanity's farthest and longest-live spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, have been travelling through space for more than 44 years. NASA launched the Voyager 1 spacecraft on September 5 1977, and the Voyager 2 on August 20 1977

Humanity's farthest and longest-live spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, have been travelling through space for more than 44 years. NASA launched the Voyager 1 spacecraft on September 5 1977, and the Voyager 2 on August 20 1977

Humanity’s farthest and longest-live spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, have been travelling through space for more than 44 years. NASA launched the Voyager 1 spacecraft on September 5 1977, and the Voyager 2 on August 20 1977

This archival photo shows engineers working on the Voyager 2 spacecraft on March 23, 1977. Voyager 2 is the only spacecraft to have flown by all four outer planets ¿ Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune

This archival photo shows engineers working on the Voyager 2 spacecraft on March 23, 1977. Voyager 2 is the only spacecraft to have flown by all four outer planets ¿ Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune

This archival photo shows engineers working on the Voyager 2 spacecraft on March 23, 1977. Voyager 2 is the only spacecraft to have flown by all four outer planets – Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune

Voyager 2 entered interstellar space on November 5, 2018. 

Both spacecraft are still sending scientific information about their surroundings through the Deep Space Network, or DSN.

The primary mission was the exploration of Jupiter and Saturn. 

The mission was extended after making a string of discoveries there — such as active volcanoes on Jupiter’s moon Io and the intricacies of Saturn’s rings. 

Voyager 2 went on to explore Uranus and Neptune and is still the only spacecraft to have visited those outer planets. 

The adventurers’ current mission, the Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM), will explore the outermost edge of the Sun’s domain — and beyond.

 Source: NASA

 

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Mbappe injury compels France to rethink Euro 2024 game plan

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France boast fearsome strength in depth but remain hugely reliant on Kylian Mbappe for inspiration and are now facing the prospect of being without their injured superstar for at least their next Euro 2024 game against the Netherlands on Friday.

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BUSINESS LIVE: NatWest to buy Sainsbury’s Bank assets; YouGov profit warning; Tate & Lyle eyes US takeover

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The FTSE 100 is up 0.1 per cent in early trading. Among the companies with reports and trading updates today are NatWest, Sainsbury’s, YouGov and Tate & Lyle. Read the Thursday 20 June Business Live blog below.

> If you are using our app or a third-party site click here to read Business Live

Tate & Lyle agrees to buy ‘mouthfeel’ ingredients maker CP Kelco

Tate & Lyle has entered into an agreement to buy US-based CP Kelco for $1.8billion, or around £1.4billion, from JM Huber Corporation.

The proposed transaction is expected to drive revenue growth and an improvement in adjusted core-profit margin over the next few years, Tate & Lyle told shareholders on Thursday.

CP Kelco is a provider of pectin, specialty gums and other nature-based ingredients.

Sainsbury’s will PAY NatWest £125m to take on the bulk of its banking arm

Sainsbury’s has struck a deal to sell the bulk of its banking assets to NatWest in a move that will see the lender take on around another million customer accounts.

The supermarket giant will pay NatWest £125million upon completion of the deal, which will see the lender acquire £1.4billion of unsecured personal loans, £1.1billion of credit card balances and approximately £2.6billion of customer deposits.

It will see NatWest take on Sainsbury’s core banking assets and liabilities, although the final consideration will be confirmed when the deal is expected to be completed in March next year.

Sainsbury’s said there would be no immediate changes to its banking customers’ terms and conditions, adding they ‘do not need to take any action’.

Market open: FTSE 100 flat; FTSE down 0.1%

London-listed stocks are treading water in early trading with investors taking a cautious stance ahead of a highly anticipated interest rate decision by the Bank of England.

While it is widely anticipated that the BoE will hold the interest rates steady when its decision is announced at 11am, all eyes will be on the vote-split and the comments from officials to assess the future trajectory of borrowing costs in Britain.

Traders are currently pricing in less than a 30 per cent chance of an initial rate cut in August. This figure could dramatically shift in either direction following the vote.

Among individual stocks, Sainsbury’s has jumped 2 per cent after NatWest struck a deal to acquire most of the banking business of the British retailer.

CMC Markets has soared 8 per cent after the trading platform posted a 52 per cent jump in its annual adjusted pre-tax profit.

Blow for borrowers as summer interest rate cut hopes fade despite inflation falling

Hopes of a summer interest rate cut faded further yesterday despite inflation falling to its 2 per cent target for the first time in nearly three years.

The Bank of England is widely expected to leave rates on hold when officials meet today.

And despite the cheer provided by yesterday’s inflation figures, markets are increasingly convinced they will remain at the same level at their next meeting in August.

Bankers bonanza as JP Morgan lifts bonus cap to ten times an employee’s base salary

UK bankers at JP Morgan could be paid bonuses worth up to ten times their salary as it becomes the latest to lift its cap on bonuses.

The Wall Street titan has scrapped previous rules which were introduced by Brussels that limited bonuses to two times an employee’s annual salary.

It means an employee earning a salary of £200,000 a year at JP Morgan might receive a pay out on top of that of up to £2million as opposed to the previous £400,000 cap.

Tate & Lyle eyes US takeover

Tate & Lyle has announced a deal to buy food and drink ingredients business CP Kelco in a roughly £1.4 billion deal.

The FTSE 250 firm told investors it has agreed to buy the pectin and xanthan gum maker from US firm JM Huber.

Nick Hampton, chief executive of Tate & Lyle, said:

‘Following on from the announcement of the proposed sale of our remaining interest in Primient last month, the proposed combination with CP Kelco represents a significant acceleration of our growth-focused strategy.

‘It creates a leading, global speciality food and beverage solutions business, ideally placed to benefit from the structural trends towards more plant-based, clean-label and sustainable ingredients and solutions.

‘The growth potential of the proposed combined business is significant and we look forward to the future with confidence and excitement.’

YouGov profit warning

Polling giant YouGov has warned full-year profits and revenues are set to come in below previous expectations.

YouGov told shareholders on Thursday it had seen ‘lower sales bookings than anticipated’, and it therefore now expects reported revenues to 2024 to come it at £324million to £327million.

It also said that while growth had shown improvement in the second half it had disappointed expectations. YouGov’s adjusted operated profit is now expected at £41million to £44million.

YouGov said: ‘As we move into FY25, we will focus on optimising our cost base and prioritising investment in key growth areas such as upgrading our Data Products, continuing to build out our AI capabilities and enhancing our sales organisation to further capitalise on YouGov’s unique asset: its high-quality global panel and proprietary dataset.’

Hargreaves Lansdown’s co-founder ‘bittersweet’ over £5.4bn sale to private equity consortium

Hargreaves Lansdown’s co-founder has described its sale to private equity buyers as ‘bittersweet’ as he voiced concerns about their intentions.

Stephen Lansdown, who has a 5.7 per cent stake in the investment platform, has backed the £5.4billion offer by a consortium of investors led by buyout giant CVC.

His comments came after HL’s board said this week it would accept the £11.40 per share deal.

NatWest to buy Sainsbury’s Bank assets

NatWest will acquire most of the banking business of Sainsbury’s, thereby growing the British lender’s assets by £2.5billion in the first major transaction executed by boss Paul Thwaite since formally taking the role last year.

The takeover will also see its customer accounts rise by around 1 million, in line with the lender’s strategy to ramp up its retail banking business.

The deal is the latest banking business disposal by a major British retailer, after rival supermarket chain Tesco offloaded most of its banking activities to Barclays in a 600 million pounds deal earlier this year.

‘As well as a complementary customer base, the transaction is expected to add scale to our credit card and unsecured personal lending business within existing risk appetite,’ Thwaite said in a statement.

‘NatWest Group has a strong track record of successful integration, and we are focussed on ensuring a smooth transition for customers.’

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Veteran French journalist ‘pushed out’ of India by denial of work permit

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A French journalist announced on Thursday that he had left India after over 13 years because his work permit was denied, describing the decision as an act of “incomprehensible censorship.”

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REVEALED: The American hotspots where the cost of vacationing has increased the most

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The American hotspots where the cost of vacationing has increased the most have been revealed, with the most expensive place setting visitors back more than $400 a day on average.

Las Vegas emerged as the destination which has seen the greatest increase in vacationing costs with a 47 percent increase in hotel prices over the last five years.

Accommodation typically now costs travelers around $252 per night.

The Nevada city also saw the price of car rentals jump by more than 60 percent to $77, while food costs were around $100 a day in 2023 according to Forbes Advisor.

The outlet ranked the 75 largest cities in the US on nine weighted metrics.

Las Vegas emerged as the destination which has seen the greatest increase in vacationing costs with a 47 percent increase in hotel prices over the last five years

Las Vegas emerged as the destination which has seen the greatest increase in vacationing costs with a 47 percent increase in hotel prices over the last five years

Las Vegas emerged as the destination which has seen the greatest increase in vacationing costs with a 47 percent increase in hotel prices over the last five years

It found that Tucson, Arizona was the hotspot with the second largest increase in vacation costs.

The foodie town, which was the first to receive the UNESCO City of Gastronomy designation in the U.S. saw huge price hikes for food and drinks and was 13th on the list nationwide in this category.

Accommodation costs saw the greatest increase, rising by nearly a third while car rental costs surged by 15 percent to $53 a day. 

Domestic flights to Tucson reduced compared to 2019, but round trip airfare still comes in at around $449 per person as of Q3 2023. 

The Californian capital Sacramento also reported huge inflation in the price of a vacation.

It experienced the greatest increase in car rentals at 37 percent to a daily cost of around $58.42 per day.

Tucson, Arizona was the hotspot with the second largest increase in vacation costs

Tucson, Arizona was the hotspot with the second largest increase in vacation costs

Tucson, Arizona was the hotspot with the second largest increase in vacation costs

Hotels cost almost $200 per night and three meals a day came in at an average cost of  $104 a day.

The Louisiana city of New Orleans and Texas’ San Antonio rounded out the top five  cities which experienced the greatest increase in travel costs.

However, Michigan’s Grand Rapids saw the highest price increase in meal prices, rising by an eyewatering 37 percent.

While inflation is continuing to pinch the whole country, not all cities are being affected equally. 

In fact vacationers looking for a bargain should head to Indianapolis where the cost of food, car rentals and airfare all dropped over the last five years.

The city saw the biggest drop in meal prices of anywhere in the country, shrinking by almost a quarter.

Flights were twelve percent cheaper last year than in 2019, while the cost of car rentals slumped by six percent.

The Californian capital Sacramento also reported huge inflation in the price of a vacation

The Californian capital Sacramento also reported huge inflation in the price of a vacation

The Californian capital Sacramento also reported huge inflation in the price of a vacation

Accommodation costs saw a slight bump of 2.25 percent to an average cost of $165.69 per night. 

The others making up the top five cities with the smallest travel cost hikes were Oakland in California, Dayton in Ohio, Houston in Texas and Kansas City in Missouri.

Across the board, domestic flights have skyrocketed in cost to an average of $384 as of the end of last year.

For those looking to snap up a bargain getaway, Forbes advises using classic money-saving tactics such as comparison shopping for flights, hotels and car rental.

Flexibility on travel dates and the exact neighborhood you stay in can also help cut costs, according to the outlet. 

Meanwhile, reward credit cards which earn points or miles can be used to secure benefits such as free meals, lounge access or an extra night’s stay.

Typically cards with a membership fee offer the greatest benefits, but even those with below average credit scores can secure affordable getaways. 

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High strength vape use surges 10-fold in just three years with over half of young users opting for the very strongest e-cig liquids, study finds

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The number of people using high-strength vapes has soared almost 10-fold in as little as three years, research shows.

A third of vapers used high-strength nicotine in January this year compared to just 3.8 per cent on average between July 2016 and June 2021.

The biggest increase was among 18-to-24-year-olds with more than half now using the strongest e-cigs.

Large rises were also seen in seen in older age groups and among current smokers and recent ex-smokers, according to the study by University College London.

Researchers looked at survey responses from 7,314 adult vapers in England between 2016 and 2024 to see how use of different nicotine strengths had changed in that period.

The biggest increase was among 18-to-24-year-olds with more than half now using the strongest e-cigs.

The biggest increase was among 18-to-24-year-olds with more than half now using the strongest e-cigs.

The biggest increase was among 18-to-24-year-olds with more than half now using the strongest e-cigs.

To assess more current use of nicotine strengths between 2022 and 2024, the researchers also looked at survey data from Wales and Scotland.

The team classified e-liquids containing 20 mg/ml of nicotine or more as high strength, which is the legal limit in the UK.

The UK Government has proposed setting three categories of tax on e-liquid, with the lowest applied to nicotine-free liquid, and the highest to e-liquid containing 11 mg/ml or more of nicotine.

The researchers found that vapers using disposable e-cigarettes tended to use higher-strength nicotine.

Lead author, Dr Sarah Jackson, said: ‘The timing of the rise in popularity of high-strength vapes coincided with the introduction of new disposable vapes, many of which contain e-liquids with nicotine concentrations at the upper end of the legal limit (20 mg/ml).

‘Disposable vapes are particularly popular among younger vapers, so to see a greater increase in the use of high-strength e-liquids among 18-24 year-olds is not surprising.’

With plans to ban disposable vapes, experts warned the high strength versions could easily be replaced with re-usable models.

The study also found an increase in the proportion of vapers using disposables and pod devices who did not know how strong their nicotine-containing e-liquid was.

Writing in the journal Addiction, they suggest better labelling is needed to ensure nicotine strength was clear to consumers.

Despite the ‘sharp increase’, researchers warned against taxing vapes according to their strength, adding it could do more harm.

Dr Sharon Cox, of the UCL Institute of Epidemiology & Health Care, said: ‘Taxing products according to nicotine strength may also result in people using a lower, cheaper strength and vaping more, as a person with nicotine dependence will alter their behaviour to get the required nicotine dose in their system. It therefore may increase the amount of liquid used and vapers’ exposure to potential toxicants.’

Deborah Arnott, CEO of Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) and a co-author of the study, said: ‘Curbing underage vaping can best be achieved by making all vapes less appealing and increasing the price at point of sale, whatever their nicotine content.

‘Those are the policies which will be most effective in stopping children from starting to vape in the first place.’

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Jude Bellingham reveals which Real Madrid wonderkid will be even better than him with the youngster already doing ‘incredible things’ in training

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  • Jude Bellingham has become one of the best players in the world at just 21 
  • He has thrived since making the switch from Borussia Dortmund to Real Madrid 
  • LISTEN to It’s All Kicking Off! Chris Sutton reveals all on why he SLAPPED David Beckham 

Jude Bellingham is somehow still only 20 despite his stratospheric rise in the game – but he has already reportedly earmarked the player that will go on to bigger and better things than himself. 

After emerging onto the scene as a prodigious talent at Birmingham, Bellingham move to Borussia Dortmund in 2020 where he would play 132 games and crop up on the radar of the biggest team of them all. 

Real Madrid ultimately won the race to sign the midfielder for £113million last summer, and since then he has fit like a glove at the Bernabeu, earning the best player gong in LaLiga in his first term.

In such a short space of time he has become second only to Harry Kane in terms of his importance to the England team, and is now considered one of the best in the world in his position. 

Yet the midfielder with the world at his feet has already told the creator of the Goldenboy award – which he won in 2023 – that he believes one of his team-mates will in fact exceed his talents. 

Jude Bellingham has sky-rocketed to become one of the leading midfielders in the world

Jude Bellingham has sky-rocketed to become one of the leading midfielders in the world

Jude Bellingham has sky-rocketed to become one of the leading midfielders in the world

He has become arguably the second most important player for England behind Harry Kane

He has become arguably the second most important player for England behind Harry Kane

He has become arguably the second most important player for England behind Harry Kane

Yet he has pinpointed one real Madrid starlet that could exceed even his own talents

Yet he has pinpointed one real Madrid starlet that could exceed even his own talents

Yet he has pinpointed one real Madrid starlet that could exceed even his own talents 

‘Last December, Jude Bellingham told me that Real Madrid had a fantastic young player who might even be a little better than him – Arda Guler,’  said Massimo Franchi, in an interview. 

‘He told me that he shows incredible things in training.’ 

Guler joined Bellingham in arriving in the Spanish capital last summer, having come through the ranks at Fenerbahce in Turkey, though for the somewhat more modest £17m.

There, he was thought of as one of the most promising talents to come through in a long time.

However in his first season he suffered a number of injury setbacks, the attacking midfielder deprived of regular game time until the end of the campaign. 

Yet after only 31 minutes of action in his first five league games he earned a more prominent place in the side, and vindicated Carlo Ancelotti’s call with five goals in his last five appearances in LaLiga. 

Despite a stop-start season, that form was enough to earn him a call-up to the Turkey squad for the European Championship, and he has already made his presence felt. 

In one of the games of the tournament so far, Turkey beat Georgia 3-1, with Guler scoring a sensational goal in the second half. 

Guler had been a constant presence in attack and decided to take the match by the scruff of the neck when he latched onto a pass, dribbled towards goal and bent his effort into the top corner to make it 2-1.

Guler scored an incredible second-half goal to re-establish Turkey's lead against Georgia

Guler scored an incredible second-half goal to re-establish Turkey's lead against Georgia

Guler scored an incredible second-half goal to re-establish Turkey’s lead against Georgia

The Real Madrid star's calm celebration came after his brilliant Euro 2024 goal of the tournament contender

The Real Madrid star's calm celebration came after his brilliant Euro 2024 goal of the tournament contender

The Real Madrid star’s calm celebration came after his brilliant Euro 2024 goal of the tournament contender

The aptly named ‘Turkish Messi’ looked in disbelief when he ran off to the corner flag celebrating before being mobbed by team-mates as Turkey forced themselves back in front.

His incredible finish from 30 yards out even had Turkey manager Vincenzo Montella jumping for joy as those in the technical area hugged each other in ecstatic celebration.

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Does your husband still love you? Put him through these tests that Gen-Z swear by

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In my schooldays, my girl friends and I spent a high proportion of our time ‘calculating’ if this boy or that boy was going to be ‘The One’ with various arcane customs.

Like peeling your satsuma in one go, which allowed you to throw the peel over your shoulder and see what letter shape it fell into. I made the mistake of being mad about a boy called Harry. Forming an ‘H’ with the peel is unlikely, so that was that.

Today, this kind of obsessive hopefulness has found a new home on TikTok. But modern young women are putting their partners to the test in rather more practical ways.

I decided to put my husband of 26 years, who is the father of my two grown-up children, through the new romantic hoops. Read on to see how Anthony got on…

THE ORANGE TEST

Ask your partner to peel an orange for you. If they do it without hesitation then they pass. If they complain, question it or refuse, the omens are not good.

My husband is a big fan of the morning grapefruit and I often sling in a request for a segment, so he’s well-trained. But I make sure to ask when we are both deep in the Sunday papers. He gets up and does it unquestioningly. Boom, Cupid’s arrow hits.

One viral test is to ask your partner to peel an orange for you. If they do it without hesitation then they pass, but if they complain, question it or refuse, the omens are not good...

One viral test is to ask your partner to peel an orange for you. If they do it without hesitation then they pass, but if they complain, question it or refuse, the omens are not good...

One viral test is to ask your partner to peel an orange for you. If they do it without hesitation then they pass, but if they complain, question it or refuse, the omens are not good…

THE BECKHAM TEST

Last year, David and Victoria Beckham, married for nearly 25 years, released their hit Netflix documentary. One clip of the couple dancing to Islands In The Stream by Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers went viral on TikTok. This, according to the internet, was peak ‘couple goals’.

To find out if your partnership matches up to the Beckhams’, put on the song and start dancing. If your partner joins in, you pass.

I make sure to put Islands In The Stream on in that slightly flirty hour my husband and I have in the kitchen, when I prepare supper and he mixes a drink and feeds the dogs. I press play.

‘What the hell is this music?’ he grimaces. ‘Can’t you put something decent on?’ Total fail.

Next day, I choose one of his favourites, Gypsies, Tramps & Thieves by Cher, and, sure enough, he responds to my swaying overtures by dancing with me. I’m chalking it up as a victory.

THE BIRD TEST

This one examines how your partner reacts to you talking about something seemingly insignificant, like a bird outside your window. Relationship gurus at the Gottman Institute in America set great store by these ‘bids for connection’, because if your partner responds with genuine curiosity, it’s a sign that they are hardwired to connect with you at any level.

‘Look, the robin is back!’ I trill, gesturing at the garden. Anthony responds immediately, coming up behind me. ‘Really? Where? Wow! Has he gone through his moult yet?’ I flutter my hands weakly, to indicate that the bird has flown.

I have a nagging feeling the bird test shouldn’t result in that much excitement — but, hey, we passed.

A clip of David and Victoria Beckham dancing during their Netflix documentary was described as peak 'couple goals', so why not test your partner into dancing with you unprovoked?

A clip of David and Victoria Beckham dancing during their Netflix documentary was described as peak 'couple goals', so why not test your partner into dancing with you unprovoked?

A clip of David and Victoria Beckham dancing during their Netflix documentary was described as peak ‘couple goals’, so why not test your partner into dancing with you unprovoked?

THE STRAWBERRY TEST

This test involves asking your partner innocuous questions about a fantasy scenario. Their answers give an insight into the stability of your relationship. So:

1. Picture a field of strawberries behind a fence. You’re hungry. How high is the fence?

2. You go into the field and steal berries. How many do you eat?

3. A farmer appears and starts shouting. What do you say?

4. How did the berries taste and how did you feel stealing them?

The height of the fence your partner pictures symbolises their self-control — the higher the fence, the higher their level of resistance to sexual temptation.

The number of berries eaten is the amount of people they can see themselves in love with at one time. Their response to the farmer is the way they’d respond if they were caught cheating. And the way they felt afterwards is how they’d feel about the affair.

At a dinner party, a few glasses of wine in, I announce that we’re playing a game. ‘Anthony, you start. You’re on a walk…’

He passes with flying colours. He chooses a 6ft fence, eats only four strawberries, and apologises to the farmer for succumbing to temptation, expressing regret for his weakness — it all means he is unlikely to stray and will be honest if he does. I feel slightly smug.

But I do worry for my friends Kay and Xander, since Kay’s response was to imagine an ankle-high fence and swiping ‘as many strawberries as I can eat’, which indicates wild infidelity and zero regrets.

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Boeing Starliner return date delayed again as NASA races to fix thrusters and plug leaks amid fears its astronauts will be ‘stranded in space’

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Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft will be stuck at the International Space Station with two astronauts onboard for even longer than expected, as the company and NASA scrambles to fix issues with its thrusters and plug helium leaks.

Officials from the aerospace company and NASA announced on Tuesday that the spacecraft is now not expected to return until at least June 26. It had originally been scheduled to return on June 14, and was last week delayed through June 22.

The officials say they are spending the extra time to investigate five helium leaks in the propeller system as well as issues with several thrusters that are used to maneuver the spaceship.

‘We’re taking a little bit of extra time to work through what we’ve seen and make sure we have all the plans in place to bring the crew home,’ Steve Stich, a NASA program manager, said at a news conference on Tuesday, according to the Wall Street Journal.

NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams will be stuck on the International Space Station for even longer, as Boeing and NASA tries to fix issues with their spacecraft

NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams will be stuck on the International Space Station for even longer, as Boeing and NASA tries to fix issues with their spacecraft

NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams will be stuck on the International Space Station for even longer, as Boeing and NASA tries to fix issues with their spacecraft

But by June 26, astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams would have spent about 20 days in space – more than double the roughly eight days they had originally planned for.

The crew has at least four months of reserves for food and other consumable items, NASA officials have said.

Starliner can also ferry the crew members back to Earth in the case of an emergency, according to Stich.

But the ship can only stay docked on the ISS for a total of 45 days due to limited fuel on the orbit laboratory, and Mike Leinbach, the former launch director for the space shuttle at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, says the mission managers won’t let the spacecraft return to Earth with astronauts onboard if it could pose any risk to them.

‘This one has a few more issues that I would have expected,’ he said, according to the Journal.

‘We hoped for a clean flight, but we didn’t get one and we’re dealing with it,’ he said, reassuring reporters: ‘They’ll figure this out.’ 

The crew has enough food rations for at  least four months on the International Space Station

The crew has enough food rations for at  least four months on the International Space Station

The crew has enough food rations for at  least four months on the International Space Station

But it remains unclear what NASA has planned if the 45 days passes without the issues being resolved, but some experts have suggested that it may have to lean into Boeing’s rival – Elon Musk’s SpaceX – to rescue the astronauts and bring them back home.

‘Good news is that they are on the ISS and not like the Apollo 13 trying to get home from the moon,’ Rudy Ridolfi, Former Space System Commander and Space Technology Acquisition Manager, told DailyMail.com.

‘But I wouldn’t be surprised if someone at NASA is getting a SpaceX Dragon capsule ready for a rescue mission.’

Mike Gruntman, professor of astronautics at the University of Southern California, also said that ‘it is more likely that SpaceX would be able to provide an additional launch in the foreseeable future to bring the astronauts back.’

‘It is highly unfortunate that Boeing’s Starliner, after so much delay with its flight, continues to face problems,’ Gruntman continued.

‘For decades, Boeing was one of the most admired aerospace and defense companies. It is a true national tragedy.’

He went on to suggest that the problems Starliner is facing may have stemmed from manufacturing issues at the scandal-plagued aerospace company.

‘Multiple similar issues – helium leaks – with seemingly similar components, as reported in the press, point to a systemic problem with design or workmanship or testing or system engineering or a combination thereof,’ Gruntman explained.

Issues with the Starliner arose even before it took off with the astronauts earlier this month

Issues with the Starliner arose even before it took off with the astronauts earlier this month

Issues with the Starliner arose even before it took off with the astronauts earlier this month

Teams detected a valve leaking helium back in May, and four more just hours after it took off

Teams detected a valve leaking helium back in May, and four more just hours after it took off

Teams detected a valve leaking helium back in May, and four more just hours after it took off 

Boeing and NASA officials first noticed issues with the Starliner even before it took off with the astronauts earlier this month. 

It has faced years of delays, setbacks and added expenses that have cost Boeing more than $1billion, CNN reports. 

Starliner was then set to launch on May 6, but teams detected a valve leaking helium and scrubbed the mission.

Engineers suspected that the issue came from a defective rubber seal the size of a shirt button, and said that even if the leak worsens, it could be managed in flight – and set the next launch for June 1.

However, Starliner was again plagued with misfortunate when the capsule was automatically halted with minutes to go before liftoff by a computer-abort system. 

The postponement was triggered by computers on the Atlas V rocket’s launchpad that coordinate the final moments before liftoff, but the Starliner capsule appeared healthy, officials said. 

The Starliner blasted off from Florida atop a United Launch Alliance Altas V rocket on June 5

The Starliner blasted off from Florida atop a United Launch Alliance Altas V rocket on June 5

The Starliner blasted off from Florida atop a United Launch Alliance Altas V rocket on June 5

It finally blasted off from Florida atop a United Launch Alliance Altas V rocket on June 5.

But just a few hours after separating from the Atlas rocket, NASA revealed the capsule had sprung two more leaks.

A fourth leak was found after docking on June 6 and the most recent hit on June 10.

In addition to the helium leaks, five thrusters temporarily malfunctioned during the flight – but four came back online. The fifth was shut off for the remainder of the mission, the Journal reports.

Wilmore and Williams are now conducting several tests on the ship, which says have gone well and are giving the team confidence that the spacecraft is recovering.

He and other officials say there is no reason to believe the Starliner won’t be able to bring the astronauts back home, as the helium leaks and thruster issues occurred on a part of the craft that is not intended to survive the trip home from space.

Mark Nappi, program manager of Boeing’s Commercial Crew Program, also claims there is ‘good thruster performance now,’ as the company tries to paint the issues with the Starliner as a learning experience.

It is under contract with NASA to conduct six more crewed flights to the space station. 

‘It’s more nominal and the (helium) leaks show that they’re stable and less than they’ve been previously,’ Nappi said. ‘That leads us to believe that we have a good safe spacecraft.’

Boeing is under contract with NASA to conduct six more crewed flights to the ISS

Boeing is under contract with NASA to conduct six more crewed flights to the ISS

Boeing is under contract with NASA to conduct six more crewed flights to the ISS

Boeing executives are now hopeful that a successful return on June 26 could prove its worth to the space agency, after a series of issues with its separate commercial airplane division. 

A Boeing plane experienced a rare Dutch roll at 32,000 feet mid-flight last month, which resulted in the aircraft being taken out of service.

In the same month, Singapore Airlines Flight SQ321 experienced fatal ‘turbulence’ that involved proximity to tropical thunderstorms.

And just last week, an Air Canada Boeing plane bursts into flames seconds after take-off.

If everything goes well on this latest test for the aerospace company, Starliner’s capsule, Calypso, would undock from the ISS at 10.10pm Eastern Time on June 25.

After undocking, Starliner will reenter the atmosphere, with the crew experiencing 3.5G as they slow down from 17,500 miles per hour to a gentle parachute- and airbag-assisted touchdown. 

They would then land at White Sands Space Harbor in the southwestern United States on June 26 at around 4.51am Eastern Time

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