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It’s all getting a bit too much for some… and Glastonbury has barely started yet!

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Glastonbury festival-goers have already been pictured taking naps in their tents and on hammocks as the heatwave gripped Worthy Farm today – with many preserving their energy ahead of the weekend’s first headliner, the Arctic Monkeys, tonight.

Spirits were high this morning as campers crawled out of their tents to tuck into cooked breakfasts and take cold outdoor showers to prepare for a jammed-full of performances by some of music’s greats.

Happy campers were treated to dry weather and sunshine throughout the day, with temperatures hitting 25C and expected to rise to 26C tomorrow. 

But after a day of partying many were left looking a little worse for wear, and retreated to their tents to cool off amid soaring temperatures.

Meanwhile some refused to let the warm weather slow them down – with a video showing one group of ravers dressed as monks and nuns putting on a bizarre show as bemused families watched on. Elsewhere, campers were seen getting ready for tonight, prepping their dazzling outfits and brushing their teeth ahead of the opener.

Thousands of music fans had been holding their breath after the performance of tonight’s headliner – the Arctic Monkeys – was thrown into doubt after the band cancelled its performance in Dublin due to sickness earlier this week.

But campers on the sprawling farm in Somerset woke up to exciting news today after the festival’s co-organiser Emily Eavis confirmed that the Arctic Monkeys would be headlining on the Pyramid Stage.

But festival-goers minds were put at ease when Ms Eavis confirmed ‘they’re on’, adding ‘it was a little bit close there for a minute and we were thinking about whether we should have a serious back-up plan in place, but no, thankfully they’re on’.

Among the stars who have already entertained crowds at the huge event are popstar Carly Rae Jepsen and British rock band Royal Blood. And, after rumours swirled all day, the Foo Fighters took to the Pyramid stage in a surprise appearance this evening.

Thousands have flocked to the Pyramid Stage on Day 3 of Glastonbury as they await the arrival of the first headline act tonight

Thousands have flocked to the Pyramid Stage on Day 3 of Glastonbury as they await the arrival of the first headline act tonight

Thousands have flocked to the Pyramid Stage on Day 3 of Glastonbury as they await the arrival of the first headline act tonight

Ecstatic music fans basked in the sunshine as they watched the likes of the Foo Fighters and Royal Blood perform this evening

Ecstatic music fans basked in the sunshine as they watched the likes of the Foo Fighters and Royal Blood perform this evening

Ecstatic music fans basked in the sunshine as they watched the likes of the Foo Fighters and Royal Blood perform this evening

The Foo Fighters took to the Pyramid stage in a surprise appearance this evening ahead of the Arctic Monkeys headliner

The Foo Fighters took to the Pyramid stage in a surprise appearance this evening ahead of the Arctic Monkeys headliner

The Foo Fighters took to the Pyramid stage in a surprise appearance this evening ahead of the Arctic Monkeys headliner

Festival-goers enjoyed a well-earned nap in hammocks in the grounds of Glastonbury

Festival-goers enjoyed a well-earned nap in hammocks in the grounds of Glastonbury

Festival-goers enjoyed a well-earned nap in hammocks in the grounds of Glastonbury

Thousands of music fans camping out on the sprawling farm in Somerset, woke up to good news today after the festival's co-organiser Emily Eavis confirmed that the Arctic Monkeys would be headlining

Thousands of music fans camping out on the sprawling farm in Somerset, woke up to good news today after the festival's co-organiser Emily Eavis confirmed that the Arctic Monkeys would be headlining

Thousands of music fans camping out on the sprawling farm in Somerset, woke up to good news today after the festival’s co-organiser Emily Eavis confirmed that the Arctic Monkeys would be headlining

A bizarre video shows two revellers dressed as monks appearing to have a wrestling contest on a dried up field at the festival

A bizarre video shows two revellers dressed as monks appearing to have a wrestling contest on a dried up field at the festival

A bizarre video shows two revellers dressed as monks appearing to have a wrestling contest on a dried up field at the festival

Another festival-goer, dressed as a nun, appeared to be adjudicating the bizarre wrestling match as bemused families watched on

Another festival-goer, dressed as a nun, appeared to be adjudicating the bizarre wrestling match as bemused families watched on

Another festival-goer, dressed as a nun, appeared to be adjudicating the bizarre wrestling match as bemused families watched on

Festival-goers were seen getting ready at camp sites as anticipation is building for tonight. Saranne Woodman from Bridgwater, Somerset brushes her teeth at the Glastonbury Festival

Festival-goers were seen getting ready at camp sites as anticipation is building for tonight. Saranne Woodman from Bridgwater, Somerset brushes her teeth at the Glastonbury Festival

Festival-goers were seen getting ready at camp sites as anticipation is building for tonight. Saranne Woodman from Bridgwater, Somerset brushes her teeth at the Glastonbury Festival

Fans wore novelty costume pieces such as heart-shaped glasses (pictured) and a wide array of decorative hats

Fans wore novelty costume pieces such as heart-shaped glasses (pictured) and a wide array of decorative hats

Fans wore novelty costume pieces such as heart-shaped glasses (pictured) and a wide array of decorative hats

Revellers enjoyed the sunshine and dry weather in Somerset on Friday - day 3 of the famous festival

Revellers enjoyed the sunshine and dry weather in Somerset on Friday - day 3 of the famous festival

Revellers enjoyed the sunshine and dry weather in Somerset on Friday – day 3 of the famous festival

Festivalgoers build a human pyramid on day three of the Glastonbury festival

Festivalgoers build a human pyramid on day three of the Glastonbury festival

Festivalgoers build a human pyramid on day three of the Glastonbury festival

Thousands of music fans camping out on the sprawling Worthy Farm in Somerset, woke up to good news today after the festival's co-organiser Emily Eavis confirmed that the Arctic Monkeys would be headlining on the Pyramid Stage tonight

Thousands of music fans camping out on the sprawling Worthy Farm in Somerset, woke up to good news today after the festival's co-organiser Emily Eavis confirmed that the Arctic Monkeys would be headlining on the Pyramid Stage tonight

Thousands of music fans camping out on the sprawling Worthy Farm in Somerset, woke up to good news today after the festival’s co-organiser Emily Eavis confirmed that the Arctic Monkeys would be headlining on the Pyramid Stage tonight

One couple even got engaged in a quieter spot while the sun was high

One couple even got engaged in a quieter spot while the sun was high

One couple even got engaged in a quieter spot while the sun was high

Music fans danced along to their favourite bands throughout Friday afternoon, amid the build-up for the Arctic Monkeys later

Music fans danced along to their favourite bands throughout Friday afternoon, amid the build-up for the Arctic Monkeys later

Music fans danced along to their favourite bands throughout Friday afternoon, amid the build-up for the Arctic Monkeys later

Revellers filled up their water as many crawled out of their heads on Friday at Worthy Farm

Revellers filled up their water as many crawled out of their heads on Friday at Worthy Farm

Revellers filled up their water as many crawled out of their heads on Friday at Worthy Farm

Festivalgoers queue for a morning coffee ahead of Friday's line-up

Festivalgoers queue for a morning coffee ahead of Friday's line-up

Festivalgoers queue for a morning coffee ahead of Friday’s line-up

People basked in the sun today where temperatures are set to soar to 25C

People basked in the sun today where temperatures are set to soar to 25C

People basked in the sun today where temperatures are set to soar to 25C 

A group of friends dressed in orange walk around the festival village at Glastonbury

A group of friends dressed in orange walk around the festival village at Glastonbury

A group of friends dressed in orange walk around the festival village at Glastonbury 

Swathes of people headed out into the sun on the third day of Glastonbury Festival

Swathes of people headed out into the sun on the third day of Glastonbury Festival

Swathes of people headed out into the sun on the third day of Glastonbury Festival 

The Glastonbury camp even has a temporary wind turbine, a good landmark for those wondering where they are

The Glastonbury camp even has a temporary wind turbine, a good landmark for those wondering where they are

The Glastonbury camp even has a temporary wind turbine, a good landmark for those wondering where they are

There have been chaotic scenes at the sprawling festival all day, none more so than a pair dressed in monk outfits  rolling around on the floor of a sun-scorched field as a pal dressed as a nun appeared to adjudicate their unusual wrestling match. 

The major rumour of the day has been in relation to a mystery band named The Churnups who are listed to perform ahead of rock duo Royal Blood and Arctic Monkeys, with fans speculating that it could be a cover name for Foo Fighters.

Sure enough, Dave Grohl and his band burst onto the Pyramid stage sending the huge crowd of fans wild. 

Addressing the rumblings earlier, Eavis said: ‘To be honest, I think there’s a lot of rumours that are circulating about The Churnups one of which is true.

‘I don’t think I can completely confirm but it’s coming soon.

‘But this is a huge, huge, huge, huge surprise and we have kept this secret for so long, just me and (her husband) Nick, we didn’t even tell the kids we were like ‘Nobody can know this’ and I think it’s going to be extraordinary later.’

An hour before slot, the band had posted a photo of flags within the festival crowd, one with the phrase Churn It Up brandished across it.

Many festivalgoers were seen enjoying their breakfast outdoors basking in the warm morning weather, while others braved the cold water stripping down to their underwear to shower.

In a statement, a spokesman for the national weather service said: ‘The weather is set fair for much of the weekend at Glastonbury Festival with only a small chance of a shower.

‘Friday and Saturday should see a good deal of dry, bright weather with some sunny spells, albeit hazy at times, with highs in the mid-20s, with some warm nights to follow once the sun goes down.

‘Sunday will see some warm sunshine at first, though a few showers are possible through the afternoon, though these will be hit and miss in nature.

‘Conditions look set to freshen up from Monday as temperatures fall closer to average.’

Ahead of the Arctic Monkeys, Carley Rae Jepson, Maisie Peters and Sparks will perform with Hozier confirming he will be one of the surprise acts performing at the festival this Friday evening.

Posting on social media this morning, he wrote: ‘Thrilled to announce I’ll be playing @glastofest again in a not-so-secret set this evening (Friday). See you at 7.30pm, WoodSIES stage.’

Speaking on Zoe Ball’s BBC Radio 2 programme this morning, Ms Eavis appeared to accidentally confirm rumours that Rick Astley and Blossoms will play a secret set this weekend.

Friends lounge outside their campsite as they await a jam-packed day full of performances from music stars

Friends lounge outside their campsite as they await a jam-packed day full of performances from music stars

Friends lounge outside their campsite as they await a jam-packed day full of performances from music stars 

Carly Rae Jepsen performs during the Friday of the Glastonbury Festival 2023

Carly Rae Jepsen performs during the Friday of the Glastonbury Festival 2023

Carly Rae Jepsen performs during the Friday of the Glastonbury Festival 2023

Maisie Peters debuts her second album during her performance at Glastonbury

Maisie Peters debuts her second album during her performance at Glastonbury

Maisie Peters debuts her second album during her performance at Glastonbury

Stefflon Don performs during the Glastonbury Festival in Worthy Farm, Somerset, on Friday

Stefflon Don performs during the Glastonbury Festival in Worthy Farm, Somerset, on Friday

Stefflon Don performs during the Glastonbury Festival in Worthy Farm, Somerset, on Friday

Fans of Carly Rae Jepsen sing along as she performs at Glastonbury on Friday

Fans of Carly Rae Jepsen sing along as she performs at Glastonbury on Friday

Fans of Carly Rae Jepsen sing along as she performs at Glastonbury on Friday

People dressed up as skeletons play instruments as they get into the festival spirit

People dressed up as skeletons play instruments as they get into the festival spirit

People dressed up as skeletons play instruments as they get into the festival spirit

revellers enjoyed sets by musicians including Maisie Peters, who released her second album just last night

revellers enjoyed sets by musicians including Maisie Peters, who released her second album just last night

revellers enjoyed sets by musicians including Maisie Peters, who released her second album just last night

Thousands of people have descended on the tiny Somerset site for a weekend of music, entertainment and speeches

Thousands of people have descended on the tiny Somerset site for a weekend of music, entertainment and speeches

Thousands of people have descended on the tiny Somerset site for a weekend of music, entertainment and speeches

Joe Wicks held a workout session for an energetic crowd at the festival this morning

Joe Wicks held a workout session for an energetic crowd at the festival this morning

Joe Wicks held a workout session for an energetic crowd at the festival this morning 

He was seen leading the crowd as they star jumped on Worthy Farm ahead of tonight's festivities

He was seen leading the crowd as they star jumped on Worthy Farm ahead of tonight's festivities

He was seen leading the crowd as they star jumped on Worthy Farm ahead of tonight’s festivities 

Children and adults alike were seen jumping up and down during the event

Children and adults alike were seen jumping up and down during the event

Children and adults alike were seen jumping up and down during the event 

The workout took place in the glorious sunshine, with temperatures expected to reach 25C later today

The workout took place in the glorious sunshine, with temperatures expected to reach 25C later today

The workout took place in the glorious sunshine, with temperatures expected to reach 25C later today

Ben Howard performing on the Other Stage an the festival's third day

Ben Howard performing on the Other Stage an the festival's third day

Ben Howard performing on the Other Stage an the festival’s third day 

The crowd watching The Master Musicians of Joujouka performing on the Pyramid Stage, at the Glastonbury Festival

The crowd watching The Master Musicians of Joujouka performing on the Pyramid Stage, at the Glastonbury Festival

The crowd watching The Master Musicians of Joujouka performing on the Pyramid Stage, at the Glastonbury Festival

A festivalgoer dressed in all all pink outfit with a matching bags stands by a perimeter fence

A festivalgoer dressed in all all pink outfit with a matching bags stands by a perimeter fence

A festivalgoer dressed in all all pink outfit with a matching bags stands by a perimeter fence 

Fitness fanatic and YouTube star Joe Wicks was seen warming up the thousands in a very energetic crowd this morning. 

He was seen running around on the Gateway Riser stage while cheery revellers copied him.

Later revellers enjoyed sets by musicians including Maisie Peters, who released her second album just last night. 

The third day of the festival will also host film screenings, theatre and circus performances and a debate titled Solidarity With Iran which will include British-Iranian charity worker Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, who was imprisoned there for six years. 

This year’s Glastonbury festival is one of the wokest ever, as Gen Zers shun the usual warm-up DJ sets and bands for political debates after a series of group workout sessions.

As the sun rose above Worthy Farm, hundreds of people were seen taking part in organised runs or a 30-minute workout session, led live by exercise guru Joe Wicks, instead of heading straight for the stages or alcohol tents. 

Exercise guru Joe Wicks got festival-goers' hearts pumping during a mid-morning HIIT workout

Exercise guru Joe Wicks got festival-goers' hearts pumping during a mid-morning HIIT workout

Exercise guru Joe Wicks got festival-goers’ hearts pumping during a mid-morning HIIT workout

Alternative healing methods included hanging upside for back pain

Alternative healing methods included hanging upside for back pain

Alternative healing methods included hanging upside for back pain

Representatives from Just Stop Oil, politicians and left-wing activists will all appear inside Left Field at Glastonbury

Representatives from Just Stop Oil, politicians and left-wing activists will all appear inside Left Field at Glastonbury

Representatives from Just Stop Oil, politicians and left-wing activists will all appear inside Left Field at Glastonbury

Health conscious Gen Zers were also seen shaking up the festivities with cold outdoor showers, stretches and even a group jog. 

The organised run, which saw around 200 people take part, stretched for around 5km as joggers pounded through the fields while others (millennials) slept off their hangovers.

And then rather than the customary ‘baby wipe’ bath, young people could be seen having showers near their tents, to ensure they feel and look fresh for the day.

Gen Z attendees – known for their health conscious lifestyles including drinking less booze than their millennial counterparts – didn’t head straight for the beers either.

The longest queues by far this morning were for artisan coffee, as ticket holders made the most of the dry weather – which is expected to peak at 25C – and got up early.

Crowds then gathered for Joe Wicks’ Glastonbury workout this morning – a 30 minute HIIT exercise class.

Alternative health solutions are also being widely promoted: including a tent charging £15 for attendees to lie upside down in an attempt to help ease back problems.

Elsewhere across the festival site are plenty of recycling stations, signs to reduce waste and biodegradable food packaging.

It comes as ticketless fans have been trying to break their way into the festival by scaling the giant 13ft walls that surround the farm.

Two Glastonbury gatecrashers documented their illegal break in which involved using grappling hooks ‘like batman’ to pull themselves over the fence.

The two young men documented their journey to the festival site, which included a long walk through fields, muddy ditches and woodland before their arrival.

In the video on TikTok the pair announced ‘today people we are breaking into Glastonbury’ and began their journey in West Pennard, around four miles from the festival each carrying camping rucksacks.

Eventually the unnamed youngsters in the video found their way to a clearing that looked directly down onto the sprawling music festival, with the famous Pyramid Stage in clear view.

They then fumbled their way down through dense woodland before approaching the looming gates. At this point they took at our their grappling hooks, pulling themselves up the side.

While they did not manage to film themselves directly pulling themselves into the festival, the video later shows them in what appears to be a security tent, surrounded by guards protecting the festival from intruders.

A pair help wash each other's hair while in swimming costumes at the Worthy Farm festival

A pair help wash each other's hair while in swimming costumes at the Worthy Farm festival

A pair help wash each other’s hair while in swimming costumes at the Worthy Farm festival 

Others were seen stripping down for cold outdoor showers as they got ready to take on day three of the festival

Others were seen stripping down for cold outdoor showers as they got ready to take on day three of the festival

Others were seen stripping down for cold outdoor showers as they got ready to take on day three of the festival 

The Glastonbury gatecrashers, who shared their break-in on TikTok, used grappling hooks to try and get over the 13ft perimeter wall

The Glastonbury gatecrashers, who shared their break-in on TikTok, used grappling hooks to try and get over the 13ft perimeter wall
In the video on TikTok the pair announced 'today people we are breaking into Glastonbury' and began their journey in West Pennard, around four miles from the festival

In the video on TikTok the pair announced 'today people we are breaking into Glastonbury' and began their journey in West Pennard, around four miles from the festival

The Glastonbury gatecrashers, who shared their break-in on TikTok, used grappling hooks to try and get over the 13ft perimeter wall 

The unnamed youngsters in the video found their way to a clearing that looked directly down onto the sprawling music festival, with the famous Pyramid Stage in clear view

The unnamed youngsters in the video found their way to a clearing that looked directly down onto the sprawling music festival, with the famous Pyramid Stage in clear view

The unnamed youngsters in the video found their way to a clearing that looked directly down onto the sprawling music festival, with the famous Pyramid Stage in clear view

A debate titled Solidarity With Iran which will include British-Iranian charity worker Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, who was imprisoned there for six years, was held at the festival today

A debate titled Solidarity With Iran which will include British-Iranian charity worker Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, who was imprisoned there for six years, was held at the festival today

A debate titled Solidarity With Iran which will include British-Iranian charity worker Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, who was imprisoned there for six years, was held at the festival today

Happy campers were seen enjoying their breakfast in the sunshine at Glastonbury Festival this morning

Happy campers were seen enjoying their breakfast in the sunshine at Glastonbury Festival this morning

Happy campers were seen enjoying their breakfast in the sunshine at Glastonbury Festival this morning 

One of the mischievous pair said while being detained, ‘It’s not good. Try again next year boys’ while a laughing security guard said ‘if you come back here again I’ll put you in a cell myself’.

And they are not the first ones to break in this year. Security guards already revealed that they have been fighting the desperate revellers trying to sneak in all week.

One security worker told The Times: ‘They try to come in under the wall. It’s like The Great Escape but in reverse.’

Another said: ‘It’s wild. We’ve had to chase people down who bolted through the gates with their bags on, and some use grappling hooks to pull panels off the wall and climb over, like Batman.’

Sunbelt Rentals, who designed and installed the huge 4.12m high and 7.8km long walls, said they are ‘virtually impenetrable’. Nevertheless, those without tickets have tried to take their chances.

Last year Kingfisher Security, who helps stop people entering the site, said that there were 127 incidents of gatecrashing.

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International

Pro-Palestinian protests sweep US universities, targeting financial ties with Israel

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Students at an increasing number of US universities are gathering in protest camps to demand that their schools cut financial ties to Israel and divest from companies that are enabling its months-long conflict in Gaza. FRANCE 24’s New York correspondent Jessica Le Masurier reports from Columbia University, where students have resumed their protest just days after they were evicted by the police.

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The human foods that could be making your dog fat, revealed – from grilled salmon to scrambled egg

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It’s something that many dog owners do on a daily basis. 

But new research might make you think twice about sneaking leftovers to your dog under the dinner table. 

The study reveals the human foods that could be making your pet fat – including grilled salmon and scrambled eggs. 

‘Most of us don’t realise just how calorie-dense our food can be for our pets,’ said Lisa Melvin, a spokesperson for Pet Range. 

‘This is especially the case for smaller dogs and breeds which are more obesity-prone, such as pugs and labradors. For small dogs like pugs, a single sausage can take up almost half of their daily recommended calorie intake.’

A new graphic might make you think twice about sneaking leftovers to your dog under the dinner table. The graphic reveals the human foods that could be making your pet fat - including grilled salmon and scrambled eggs

A new graphic might make you think twice about sneaking leftovers to your dog under the dinner table. The graphic reveals the human foods that could be making your pet fat - including grilled salmon and scrambled eggs

A new graphic might make you think twice about sneaking leftovers to your dog under the dinner table. The graphic reveals the human foods that could be making your pet fat – including grilled salmon and scrambled eggs

How many daily calories should your dog be consuming?
Weight of dog  Recommended calories 
XS: 2kg – 5kg (Eg. Chihuahua) 247
S: 5kg – 10kg (Eg. Pug)  440 
M: 10kg – 20kg (Eg. Beagle)  739 
L: 20kg – 30kg (Eg. Dalmation)  1092 
XL: 30kg – 40kg (Eg. Labrador Retriever)  1408 
XXL: 40kg – 50kg (Eg. Rottweiler)  1701 

Britain is in the midst of an ‘overweight epidemic’ in dogs, with a whopping one in 14 pups recorded by their vets as overweight each year. 

One of the potential reasons for these high rates is owners treating their pets to human foods, without knowing how this can impact their diet. 

In their study, Pet Range looked at the recommended daily calorie intake for dogs of varying sizes. 

Dogs classed as extra small, such as Chihuahuas, need just 247 calories per day, while small dogs, such as Pugs, require 440 calories on average. 

Medium dogs, such as Beagles, need 739 calories, while Large dogs, such as Dalmations, require 1,092 calories. 

Britain is in the midst of an 'overweight epidemic' in dogs, with a whopping one in 14 pups recorded by their vets as overweight each year (stock image)

Britain is in the midst of an 'overweight epidemic' in dogs, with a whopping one in 14 pups recorded by their vets as overweight each year (stock image)

Britain is in the midst of an ‘overweight epidemic’ in dogs, with a whopping one in 14 pups recorded by their vets as overweight each year (stock image)

Finally, extra large dogs such as Labrador Retrievers, need 1,408 calories, while extra extra large dogs, such as Rottweilers, need 1,701. 

Based on these figures, Pet Range looked at the calorie percentage of popular human leftovers or adults dogs. 

While two rashers of bacon might seem like a reasonable portion size for a dog, the analysis reveals how this equates to 58.5 per cent of XS dogs’ daily calories. 

Even for XXL dogs, this portion size is the equivalent of 8.5 per cent of their daily calorie recommendation.   

Two other popular meats – sausages and roast chicken – can also make your pooch pile on the pounds. 

One thick sausage takes up 27 per cent of a small dog’s daily calories, 16 per cent of a medium dog’s calories, and 11 per cent of a large dog’s calories. 

However, the research reveals that it isn’t just meat which can be highly calorific for dogs. 

If you’ve got leftover scrambled egg from your breakfast, the equivalent of just one egg can take up 31 per cent of an extra small dog’s calories. 

Meanwhile, one tablespoon of cheddar cheese can take up 10 per cent of a small dog’s daily calories.  

‘Many of us don’t realise just how many conditions can be linked to having excess weight,’ Ms Melvin said. 

‘From bone health to heart health to simply overall wellbeing, obesity can come with a huge toll on your pet.’

If you’ve noticed your dog has been gaining excess weight, thankfully there are several things you can do to help them get into shape. 

‘To help your pet lose weight healthily and sustainably, ensure they have filling, balanced meals and enjoy their food in moderation,’ Ms Melvin added. 

‘It’s always a good idea to see a vet if you have concerns about your pet’s weight. 

‘Every dog is different, and just like humans, they all have different nutritional needs. 

‘Whether your furry friend is a puppy or fully grown, consult with the vet before making major dietary changes.’

WHAT ARE THE TEN COMMONLY HELD MYTHS ABOUT DOGS?

It is easy to believe that dogs like what we like, but this is not always strictly true. 

Here are ten things which people should remember when trying to understand their pets, according to Animal behaviour experts Dr Melissa Starling and Dr Paul McGreevy, from the University of Sydney.

1. Dogs don’t like to share 

2. Not all dogs like to be hugged or patted 

3. A barking dog is not always an aggressive dog 

4. Dogs do not like other dogs entering their territory/home

5. Dogs like to be active and don’t need as much relaxation time as humans 

6. Not all dogs are overly friendly, some are shyer to begin with  

7. A dog that appears friendly can soon become aggressive 

8. Dogs need open space and new areas to explore. Playing in the garden won’t always suffice 

9. Sometimes a dog isn’t misbehaving, it simply does not understand what to do or what you want 

10. Subtle facial signals often preempt barking or snapping when a dog is unhappy

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The best investment trusts for your pension – experts reveal their picks

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Best investment trusts for your pension: Tips for your portfolio throughout your financial life

Best investment trusts for your pension: Tips for your portfolio throughout your financial life

Best investment trusts for your pension: Tips for your portfolio throughout your financial life

When it comes to building your pension pot or investing it for retirement income, finding a reliable investment matters.

Returns are never guaranteed – and investments go down as well as up – but there are some characteristics that make some stand out. 

Many investment trusts have built remarkable track records for raising dividends, making them a popular option for people drawing down an income in retirement.

But financial advisers have also come up with some top picks from the world of investment trusts for those still building up a pension too.

The Association of Investment Companies has compiled expert recommendations for what is known in financial jargon as the ‘accumulation’ phase of a saver’s life, and for those needing an income in the ‘decumulation’ stage in retirement.

Investment trusts are listed companies with shares that trade on the stock market. 

They are known as closed-ended, because investors can buy or sell shares to join or leave, but new money outside this pool cannot be raised without issuing new shares.

That is unlike open-ended investment funds where money is pooled to invest in shares, bonds or other funds.

Investment trusts can be riskier than funds because their shares can trade at a premium or discount to the value of the assets they hold – see below for more on how this works.

Although the list below has been picked by four professional financial advisers, remember that this is not individual financial advice and you should always check if an individual investment is right for you. If in doubt, seek independent financial advice.

Saving: ‘I’m still building up a pension’

Paul Chilver, financial planning manager at Birkett Long

With the seemingly ever-increasing state pension age and the forthcoming increase to the age an individual can access their pension, investing into a pension is for the long term.

With this in mind investment trusts, many of which are trading close to record discounts, could be an excellent option.

Discounts are particularly attractive on UK-focused investment trusts and one suggestion for the accumulation stage of investment is the Mercantile Investment Trust managed by JPMorgan which has been at a double-digit discount for many months despite very good short-term performance.

Mercantile Investment Trust (Ongoing charge: 1.41 per cent)

Philippa Maffioli, senior investment manager at Blyth-Richmond Investment Managers

During the accumulation phase when growth and diversification are essential, I recommend Worldwide Healthcare Trust.

This global trust gives investors the opportunity to gain exposure to pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and other related healthcare companies all within an actively managed portfolio.

These range from large multinational pharmaceuticals to unquoted emerging biotechnology companies. The fund is managed by OrbiMed Capital which was founded in 1989 and has become the largest healthcare investment firm in the world.

The team are actively looking at nearly 1,000 companies and the team works to identify sources of outperformance as well as those with underappreciated products in the pipeline with high quality management teams and strong financial resources.

Worldwide Healthcare Trust (Ongoing charge: 0.83per cent)

I am very keen for my clients to gain exposure to the management style of Spencer Adair and Malcolm MacColl of The Monks Investment Trust during the accumulation phase of a Sipp.

Their aim is to focus on global companies from a range of profiles with above average earnings growth which they expect to hold for around five years.

That said, they are known for addressing issues head on and aren’t afraid to take a critical look at their portfolio when necessary, which I believe is very compelling.

I believe that Monks is well positioned to capitalise on the continuous shift to a more digitalised world and must be included in a portfolio where growth is required.

Monks Investment Trust (Ongoing charge: 0.69 per cent)

Charges and net asset value explained 

 Ongoing charges

The ongoing charge, aka OCF, is the investing industry’s standard measure of fund or trust running costs.

It’s measured as an annual percentage and the bigger it is, the costlier the fund is to run.

Net asset value 

A trust’s shares can trade at a premium or discount to the value of the assets it holds, known as the net asset value.

NAV is calculated by dividing the total value of  a trust’s assets (what it owns) minus liabilities (what it owes) by the amount of shares existing.

A trust’s share price can fall below the total value of its holdings if it is unpopular and people do not want to invest but do want to sell. This pushes down demand and drives up the supply of its units for sale.

This gives new investors the opportunity to buy in at a discount, but means existing investors’ holdings are worth less than they should be.

An investment trust trading at a discount to NAV may be regarded as cheap because the shares cost less than its overall value – although there might be good reasons why, such as investors being justifiably pessimistic about its prospects.

When a trust trades at a premium to NAV it is more expensive than its net worth.

Doug Brodie, founder and chief executive of Chancery Lane

In building pensions investors should take note that trusts like Lowland, Murray International and City of London have all handsomely outperformed the FTSE All Share over the last 20 years.

Investment trusts may not have the sales and marketing budgets of pension companies so investors have to look a bit harder.

A quick look at the long-term returns will show folk there’s a good reason that institutional investors are big investors in trusts.

Lowland (Ongoing charge: 1.03 per cent)

Murray International (Ongoing charge: 0.78 per cent)

City of London (Ongoing charge: 0.65 per cent)

Neil Mumford, chartered financial planner at Milestone Wealth Management

For those looking for growth, I’d recommend JPMorgan Global Growth and Income Trust. This is one of the few investment trusts to be trading at a premium, but this should not concern long-term investors.

It places a high emphasis on the world’s largest stock market the US, accounting for two-thirds of the portfolio. It is a high conviction portfolio with 50 to 90 holdings, with the top ten making up more than 40% of the portfolio.

This has allowed it to outperform by some margin with a 305 per cent return over the last ten years.

There will be times when there may be swings in the portfolio value but for the patient investor this will hopefully pay off. If there was concern about the premium, this trust would also be ideal for regular monthly investments.

JPMorgan Global Growth and Income (Ongoing charge: 0.66 per cent)

Drawdown: I need to invest for income

Neil Mumford of Milestone Wealth Management

The Scottish American Investment Company is my choice for someone looking at building either an income or growth portfolio and is a top five holding in my own Sipp.

I am still accumulating but it will stay once I am drawing down. It is a truly diversified equity portfolio, spread equally between the US and Europe at around 35 per cent each of the portfolio.

Neil Mumford: The Scottish American Investment Company is a top five holding in my own Sipp

Neil Mumford: The Scottish American Investment Company is a top five holding in my own Sipp

Neil Mumford: The Scottish American Investment Company is a top five holding in my own Sipp

Although it doesn’t have the highest yield at 2.9 per cent, this dividend hero has increased its payouts by an average of 4.2 per cent a year over the past five years and this dividend increase has not hampered its ability to grow capital – a total return of more than 170% over the last ten years should please any investor. 

The price is currently a complete bargain when you consider that it is trading at an extremely attractive discount to net assets of around 10 per cent when historically it has been trading at near NAV or at a premium.

Scottish American Investment Company (Ongoing charge: 1.01 per cent)

Philippa Maffioli of Blyth-Richmond Investment Managers

During the decumulation phase when capital growth is not as important and the emphasis can shift towards capital preservation, Personal Assets Trust has an important place in many retirees’ portfolios.

The manager’s approach is reassuringly conservative and is focused on looking at the risk of losing money rather than the risk of volatility.

Even though this is the case, it offers global diversification across four asset classes and is a bedrock for lower risk and/or decumulating portfolios.

It is managed by Sebastian Lyon who is assisted by Charlotte Yonge and their policy is to protect and increase (in that order) the value of shareholders’ funds over the long term.

Personal Assets Trust (Ongoing charge: 0.67 per cent)

Ruffer Investment Company is another trust which concentrates on capital preservation and has a very successful track record in achieving this.

The objective is to maintain a diverse strategy incorporating short-dated bonds, credit and derivative strategies and precious metals, plus a diverse spread of international equities.

The investment strategy and asset allocation are set by Henry Maxey and Neil McLeish, Co-Chief Investment Officers, supported by a team of senior fund managers and research analysts.

Paul Chilver: Investment trusts can smooth their income payments, meaning some income can be retained in case it is needed in future

Paul Chilver: Investment trusts can smooth their income payments, meaning some income can be retained in case it is needed in future

Paul Chilver: Investment trusts can smooth their income payments, meaning some income can be retained in case it is needed in future

Ruffer seeks to preserve capital using a very disciplined approach with the prime objective of maintaining value over a one-year period and growing capital over the longer term. This means they would perceive a loss in line with the market as a failure.

Ruffer Investment Company (Ongoing charge: 1.07 per cent)

Paul Chilver of Birkett Long

When you come to draw an income from your pension investment trusts are an excellent choice.

In part this is because they can smooth their income payments, meaning some income can be retained in the trust in case it is needed in future when stock markets may be more volatile.

There are many investment trusts paying an attractive dividend and my first suggestion is a UK-focused investment trust, Edinburgh Investment Trust.

This is a long-standing investment trust and is now managed by Liontrust following their acquisition of Majedie.

A second suggestion would be a global investment trust, JPMorgan Global Growth and Income.

This trust has its greatest weighting to US equities and is currently paying a yield of 3.4 per cent per annum.

Edinburgh Investment Trust (Ongoing charge: 0.53 per cent)

JPMorgan Global Growth and Income – also see above (Ongoing charge: 0.66 per cent)

Compare the best DIY investing platforms and stocks & shares Isas

Investing online is simple, cheap and can be done from your computer, tablet or phone at a time and place that suits you.

When it comes to choosing a DIY investing platform, stocks & shares Isa or a general investing account, the range of options might seem overwhelming. 

Every provider has a slightly different offering, charging more or less for trading or holding shares and giving access to a different range of stocks, funds and investment trusts. 

When weighing up the right one for you, it’s important to to look at the service that it offers, along with administration charges and dealing fees, plus any other extra costs.

To help you compare the best investment accounts, we’ve crunched the facts and pulled together a comprehensive guide to choosing the best and cheapest investing account for you. 

We highlight the main players in the table below but would advise doing your own research and considering the points in our full guide linked here.

>> This is Money’s full guide to the best investing platforms and Isas 

Platforms featured below are independently selected by This is Money’s specialist journalists. If you open an account using links which have an asterisk, This is Money will earn an affiliate commission. We do not allow this to affect our editorial independence. 

DIY INVESTING PLATFORMS AND STOCKS & SHARES ISAS 
Admin charge Charges notes Fund dealing Standard share, trust, ETF dealing Regular investing Dividend reinvestment
AJ Bell*  0.25%  Max £3.50 per month for shares, trusts, ETFs.  £1.50 £5  £1.50 £1.50 per deal  More details
Bestinvest* 0.40% (0.2% for ready made portfolios) Account fee cut to 0.2% for ready made investments Free £4.95 Free for funds  Free for income funds More details
Charles Stanley Direct* 0.35%  No platform fee on shares if a trade in that month and annual max of £240 Free £11.50 n/a n/a More details
Fidelity* 0.35% on funds £7.50 per month up to £25,000 or 0.35% with regular savings plan.  Free £7.50 Free funds £1.50 shares, trusts ETFs £1.50 More details
Hargreaves Lansdown* 0.45% Capped at £45 for shares, trusts, ETFs Free £11.95 £1.50 1% (£1 min, £10 max) More details
Interactive Investor*  £4.99 per month under £50k, £11.99 above, £10 extra for Sipp Free trade worth £3.99 per month (does not apply to £4.99 plan) £3.99 £3.99 Free £0.99 More details
iWeb £100 one-off fee (waived until July 2024) £5 £5 n/a 2%, max £5 More details
 Accounts that have some limits but attractive offers    
Etoro*  No investment funds or Sipp Free Investment account offers stocks and ETFs. Beware high risk CFDs. Not available  Free  n/a  n/a  More details 
Trading 212  Free  Investment account offers stocks and ETFs. Beware high risk CFDs.  Not available  Free  n/a  Free  More details 
Freetrade* No investment funds  Basic account free,  Standard with Isa £4.99, Plus £9.99 Freetrade Plus with more investments and Sipp is £9.99/month inc. Isa fee No funds  Free  n/a  n/a  More details 
Vanguard  Only Vanguard’s own products 0.15%  Only Vanguard funds Free  Free only Vanguard ETFs  Free  n/a  More details 
(Source: ThisisMoney.co.uk Mar 2024. Admin % charge may be levied monthly or quarterly

 

Some links in this article may be affiliate links. If you click on them we may earn a small commission. That helps us fund This Is Money, and keep it free to use. We do not write articles to promote products. We do not allow any commercial relationship to affect our editorial independence.

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TikTok ban bill passes US Senate, what happens next?

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The U.S. Senate on Tuesday passed legislation giving TikTok’s Chinese owner, ByteDance, about nine months to divest the U.S. assets of the short-video app, or face a nationwide ban. President Joe Biden said he will to sign the bill into law on Wednesday.

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Want to find out how good a hotel can be? Inside the hyper-luxurious Four Seasons Hotel George V Paris, which has a staggering SIX Michelin stars between three restaurants (and an interior that resembles a palace)

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It’s surely the world’s fanciest food court.

I’m sitting in a one-Michelin-star restaurant looking directly across at a two-Michelin-star restaurant, with a three-Michelin-star eaterie to the left.

Talk about paradise for foodies.

These six Michelin stars are all under one roof, fanned around the ‘Marble Courtyard’ at the hyper-luxurious, ‘palace-rated’ Four Seasons Hotel George V Paris, which surely has bragging rights for the best hotel fine-dining offering in the world.

Our first taste of what the property’s culinary wonderland tenders is at the one-Michelin-starred Italian restaurant, Le George, where Chef Simone Zanoni sets the bar stratospherically high.

MailOnline Travel's Ted Thornhill checks in to the hyper-luxurious, 'palace-rated' Four Seasons Hotel George V, Paris. Above is the 'blissful' indoor pool

MailOnline Travel's Ted Thornhill checks in to the hyper-luxurious, 'palace-rated' Four Seasons Hotel George V, Paris. Above is the 'blissful' indoor pool

MailOnline Travel’s Ted Thornhill checks in to the hyper-luxurious, ‘palace-rated’ Four Seasons Hotel George V, Paris. Above is the ‘blissful’ indoor pool

The Four Seasons Hotel George V Paris has an amazing flower-filled lobby

The Four Seasons Hotel George V Paris has an amazing flower-filled lobby

The Four Seasons Hotel George V Paris has an amazing flower-filled lobby

Amid gloriously opulent surroundings – think dazzling chandeliers, mesmerising marble floors and elegant white chairs – and with the almost-full restaurant buzzing with exhilarated diners, we are treated to a tour de force of gastronomic treats, fashioned from the freshest of fresh ingredients.

Seasonal fruits and vegetables are supplied all year long to Le George from the chemical-free Domaine de Madame Elisabeth, a vast lush estate that once belonged to the sister of King Louis XVI that lies 20 kilometres (13 miles) southwest of Paris in Versailles.

Refreshingly for a Michelin-star dining room, there are multiple menu options – eight-course tasting (155 euros/£132/$165), three-course set lunch (80 euros/£68/$85) and a la carte, with a whole page dedicated to crudo (raw) options.

We don’t think our six-year-old daughter will stay compliant for the full-fat ‘menu degustation’ experience, so we go for the semi-skimmed set lunch, which is still a mini banquet.

We feel like we’ve been transported to a rustic seaside Italian village with gorgeous focaccia, sublime slices of yellowtail kingfish crudo with mandarin vinaigrette, speckled with dots of pureed lemon and roasted garlic, and delectable fried baby shrimps to nibble on.

Chef Simone keeps our taste buds enlivened with veal and oyster-mushroom bites drizzled with an oxtail and red wine jus. They resemble little flying saucers. They taste out of this world.

The hotel's three main restaurants are grouped around the Marble Courtyard, above

The hotel's three main restaurants are grouped around the Marble Courtyard, above

The hotel’s three main restaurants are grouped around the Marble Courtyard, above

The hotel's Italian restaurant, Le George, 'where Chef Simone Zanoni sets the bar stratospherically high'

The hotel's Italian restaurant, Le George, 'where Chef Simone Zanoni sets the bar stratospherically high'

The hotel’s Italian restaurant, Le George, ‘where Chef Simone Zanoni sets the bar stratospherically high’

The piece de resistance is the lip-smackingly delicious wood-fire-roasted Aveyron lamb with a lemon zest and shizo vinegar sauce.

A smoky slab of perfection.

To finish, it’s a lovely baba al limoncello with mint sorbet and Amalfi lemon marmalade.

As for the service, I wish I could bottle the waiting staff’s passion and enthusiasm.

At one point, my partner drops a knife – it is replaced fuss-free in almost the blink of an eye by a waiter whose feet appear not to touch the ground as he glides across the dining room in emergency response mode.

While special mention goes to our excellent Italian sommelier, who picks out some corking wines by the glass, including a terrific textured red from the Barolo region of Italy, a lip-smackingly moreish Monteraponi Chianti Classico and a beautifully buttery white by the Eduardo Torres Acosta winery in Sicily.

The restaurants around the Marble Courtyard have six Michelin stars between them - Le Cinq has three, L'Orangerie has two and Le George has one

The restaurants around the Marble Courtyard have six Michelin stars between them - Le Cinq has three, L'Orangerie has two and Le George has one

The restaurants around the Marble Courtyard have six Michelin stars between them – Le Cinq has three, L’Orangerie has two and Le George has one

The 244-room hotel proudly boasts of its location 'in the heart of the city's Golden Triangle designer shopping district'

The 244-room hotel proudly boasts of its location 'in the heart of the city's Golden Triangle designer shopping district'

The 244-room hotel proudly boasts of its location ‘in the heart of the city’s Golden Triangle designer shopping district’

By Le George, I’m keen to return.

For our evening meal, we rotate to the opposite side of the courtyard – via a cocktail at the hotel’s ooh-la-la-inducing bar – and take a seat at the two-Michelin-starred L’Orangerie.

Here the cooking is artier, the service more earnest (with a slightly intimidating sommelier) – and the atmosphere more intimate, with just six tables occupying an elegant conservatory extension to the hotel’s gorgeous all-day dining lounge, La Galerie.

The overall experience? Unforgettable, with full marks dispatched from this diner to Chef Alan Taudon for a series of virtuoso dishes, with some that are how-on-earth-did-he-make-that amazing.

L'Orangerie, where Ted experiences 'a series of virtuoso dishes, with some that are how-on-earth-did-he-make-that amazing'

L'Orangerie, where Ted experiences 'a series of virtuoso dishes, with some that are how-on-earth-did-he-make-that amazing'

L’Orangerie, where Ted experiences ‘a series of virtuoso dishes, with some that are how-on-earth-did-he-make-that amazing’

La Galerie, Four Seasons George V's 'gorgeous all-day dining lounge'

La Galerie, Four Seasons George V's 'gorgeous all-day dining lounge'

La Galerie, Four Seasons George V’s ‘gorgeous all-day dining lounge’

Amuse bouche at L'Orangerie - 'buckwheat pancakes' with lobster condiment and yogurt tartlets with horseradish, peas, and red currant

Amuse bouche at L'Orangerie - 'buckwheat pancakes' with lobster condiment and yogurt tartlets with horseradish, peas, and red currant
L'Orangerie's 'citrus garden' dessert

L'Orangerie's 'citrus garden' dessert

LEFT: Amuse bouche at L’Orangerie – ‘buckwheat pancakes’ with lobster condiment and yogurt tartlets with horseradish, peas, and red currant. RIGHT: L’Orangerie’s ‘citrus garden’ dessert

Chef Taudon’s repertoire is drawn from two sources – plants and fish – and he offers a seven-course tasting menu at 235 euros (£200/$250) and a five-course ‘Discovery’ menu at 180 euros ($190/£200).

Given our earlier indulgencies we opt for the Discovery experience. And discover it’s plenty of food for the money – and a feast for the eyes (and smartphone lenses). Some of the dishes resemble miniature sculptures, and each is presented on its own bespoke, uniquely designed plate.

After a palette-cleansing celery, apple, and ginger cocktail, delicate amuse bouche arrive – ‘buckwheat pancakes’ with lobster condiment and yogurt tartlets with horseradish, peas, and red currant – served in a giant shell of a dish with dry ice wafting theatrically around them; spider crab with caviar has us ooh-ing and aah-ing, as does the green asparagus with cloudy rice fermentation and truffled mousseline.

Chef Taudon’s seaweed and plankton butter is almost orgasmic – I could eat it out of a cone – but it’s his signature dish of grilled sea bream with a wavy strand of pasta and jalapeno pepper sauce that takes the home the gold star – to take something so simple as a slice of fish and elevate it to an unadulterated taste sensation takes some skill.

Le Cinq (above) is where breakfast is served to guests. Ted unfortunately missed out on breakfast due to an early train, but a receptionist fetched him a croissant for the journey

Le Cinq (above) is where breakfast is served to guests. Ted unfortunately missed out on breakfast due to an early train, but a receptionist fetched him a croissant for the journey

Le Cinq (above) is where breakfast is served to guests. Ted unfortunately missed out on breakfast due to an early train, but a receptionist fetched him a croissant for the journey

French designer Pierre-Yves Rochon has redesigned the hotel's duplex city-view suites (above)

French designer Pierre-Yves Rochon has redesigned the hotel's duplex city-view suites (above)

French designer Pierre-Yves Rochon has redesigned the hotel’s duplex city-view suites (above) 

Ted describes the bedrooms at the hotel as 'sumptuously regal, with mindblowingly comfortable beds'

Ted describes the bedrooms at the hotel as 'sumptuously regal, with mindblowingly comfortable beds'

Ted describes the bedrooms at the hotel as ‘sumptuously regal, with mindblowingly comfortable beds’ 

There’s also some skill involved in the ‘citrus garden’ dessert – twirls, strands, slices and little tubes of rice pudding, lemon caviar, fried rice chips and pink grapefruit sorbet.

Wine-wise I savour a Saint-Aubin premier cru that’s about as close to homemade ice-cream a wine can ever come.

We sadly miss breakfast, which is served in the three-star dining room, as we head out before sunrise to catch a TGV to the Alps. The look of horror on the face of the receptionist when she learns of this omission to our itinerary sums up the dedication to guest happiness here – off she whizzes to fetch us a pain au chocolat and croissant for the journey.

A oui bit special: The image above shows the elegantly appointed Four Seasons Suite

A oui bit special: The image above shows the elegantly appointed Four Seasons Suite

A oui bit special: The image above shows the elegantly appointed Four Seasons Suite

Le Bar, which Ted describes as 'ooh-la-la-inducing'. He stopped by there for a cocktail, in between his Michelin-starred dining experiences

Le Bar, which Ted describes as 'ooh-la-la-inducing'. He stopped by there for a cocktail, in between his Michelin-starred dining experiences

Le Bar, which Ted describes as ‘ooh-la-la-inducing’. He stopped by there for a cocktail, in between his Michelin-starred dining experiences

Ted writes that 'wandering the magnificent public spaces... is a joy'. Above - La Galerie

Ted writes that 'wandering the magnificent public spaces... is a joy'. Above - La Galerie

Ted writes that ‘wandering the magnificent public spaces… is a joy’. Above – La Galerie

Pictured above is the hotel's Eiffel Tower Suite. Rooms at the hotel start at around £1,600 ($2,000) a night

Pictured above is the hotel's Eiffel Tower Suite. Rooms at the hotel start at around £1,600 ($2,000) a night

Pictured above is the hotel’s Eiffel Tower Suite. Rooms at the hotel start at around £1,600 ($2,000) a night

The Arc de Triomphe, Place de la Concorde and Eiffel Tower are just moments away from the property

The Arc de Triomphe, Place de la Concorde and Eiffel Tower are just moments away from the property

The Arc de Triomphe, Place de la Concorde and Eiffel Tower are just moments away from the property

It’s a painful departure, for this is a hotel that bewitches like no other, and not just on the food front.

Wandering the magnificent public spaces, with their incredible flower displays, is a joy, the elegant subterranean pool with its mosaic tiling is bliss – and the bedrooms are sumptuously regal, with mindblowingly comfortable beds.

I feel like I’m in the arms of angels after lights-out.

The 244-room hotel proudly boasts of its location ‘in the heart of the city’s Golden Triangle designer shopping district’, with the Champs-Elysées, Avenue Marceau and Avenue Montaigne bordering the property and the Arc de Triomphe, Place de la Concorde and Eiffel Tower just moments away.

It’s a worthwhile brag – but I’d argue the hotel is an attraction in itself.

Ever wondered how good a hotel can get? Step this way.

TRAVEL FACTS 

Ted was hosted by Four Seasons Hotel George V, Paris, where rooms start from around £1,600 ($2,000) a night.

Visit www.fourseasons.com/paris. 

French designer Pierre-Yves Rochon has redesigned the hotel’s duplex city-view suites, the Parisian Suite and the Grand Premiere Suite. For more information about the hotel’s suites visit www.fourseasons.com/paris/accommodations/#suites and and www.fourseasons.com/paris/accommodations/#signature-suites.

The hotel has launched a brand new ‘lunch at potager’ experience ‘an authentic experience’ with Le George’s Michelin-starred chef Simone Zanoni ‘that takes guests outside of Paris, guiding them to discover a vegetable garden where they will pick vegetables, prepare simple and unpretentious dishes, and share a lunch in a rustic yet chic atmosphere’. 

For more information visit www.fourseasons.com/paris/experiences.

For more information on the hotel’s dreamy spa, visit www.fourseasons.com/paris/spa. 

PROS: Incredible trio of world-class restaurants, gold-standard service, regal rooms, luxurious throughout, superb location, blissful swimming pool. A hotel that aims for the summit of perfection and just about gets there.

CONS: Don’t be silly. 

Rating out of five (as if you had to ask): ***** 

GETTING THERE

The best way of reaching Paris from the UK is via the high-speed Eurostar train service. Standard tickets cost from £39, standard premier from £70 and business premier from £275.

Eurostar operates 17 trains a day from London St Pancras International to Paris Gare Du Nord. The fastest London to Paris journey time is 2hrs 16 minutes, with each train able to carry up to 894 passengers.

Visit www.eurostar.com/uk-en.

Want to arrive at the hotel in style? Then book a Blacklane chauffeur

Blacklane chauffeurs are extremely courteous, drive carefully and will transport you in a luxury car. The drivers, all trained at the Blacklane Chauffeur Academy, will always provide bottled water, Wi-Fi, and a multi-charger cable.

The ‘First Class’ service allows clients to travel in ‘true luxury’, with a fleet of vehicles including Mercedes-Benz S-Class, BMW 7 Series, Audi A8 or EVs such as Mercedes-Benz EQS.

Chauffeurs will wait up to one hour to allow for delays, and clients can cancel their ride up to one hour before their booking time.

Visit www.blacklane.com/en.

 

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Doctors said my excruciating back pain was down to a slipped disc – but the truth was much worse: Agony of gym-loving father, 46, diagnosed with blood cancer which could come back at any point

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A father’s excruciating back pain that was dismissed as a slipped disc by doctors actually ended up being cancer. 

David Windle, from Camberwell in south London, was at one point unable to move because doing so would leave him in agony. 

Despite numerous trips to his GP, osteopath and physiotherapist in December 2021 and January, the 46-year-old was still in crippling pain. 

Mr Windle assumed it was a nasty flare-up of a twinge that he suffered years earlier at the gym but was desperate for relief. 

On two occasions before his eventual myeloma diagnosis, he was even sent to A&E. Medics there ruled he likely had a slipped disc – when soft tissue between bones in the spine pushes out — that was pressing on nerves.

David Windle, 46, who kept fit by going to the gym, running and cycling, dismissed his back pain for almost four years putting it down to a gym injury

David Windle, 46, who kept fit by going to the gym, running and cycling, dismissed his back pain for almost four years putting it down to a gym injury

David Windle, 46, who kept fit by going to the gym, running and cycling, dismissed his back pain for almost four years putting it down to a gym injury

Mr Windle’s pain progressed to the point where he’d ‘crawl across the floor from the bed and lie there’. 

During the February 2022 half-term, he needed his mother to help look after his two children, Sylvie, 9 and Otis, 6.

Recalling the extent of his pain, Mr Windle, a deputy headteacher, told MailOnline: ‘I was supposed to look after my kids.  

‘I had to call my mum and say I can’t move, you need to come and look after kids.

‘I would just get out of bed every day and crawl across the floor from the bed and lie there.’

The deputy headteacher, pictured with his wife Emma Smith, 49, was told his back pain could be a slipped disc

The deputy headteacher, pictured with his wife Emma Smith, 49, was told his back pain could be a slipped disc

The deputy headteacher, pictured with his wife Emma Smith, 49, was told his back pain could be a slipped disc

In February 2022 aged 44, Mr Windle was diagnosed with myeloma, a type of blood cancer that can affect your bones

In February 2022 aged 44, Mr Windle was diagnosed with myeloma, a type of blood cancer that can affect your bones

In February 2022 aged 44, Mr Windle was diagnosed with myeloma, a type of blood cancer that can affect your bones

When Mr Windle went back to work after half-term, he would ‘find an empty office to lie in’ just to help him get through the day. Eventually, he found himself working from home propped up by cushions. 

His osteopath suggested getting an MRI scan, although he wasn’t able to get one on the NHS.

Mr Windle, who paid to get one privately, said it ‘revealed the disaster which was the next year and a half of my life’.

Scans revealed one of his vertebrae had disintegrated with no known cause – but he was told it could be a cancer.

He said: ‘It was a terrible moment. I was sitting there and the world just disappeared around me.’

WHAT IS MYELOMA? 

Myeloma is a blood cancer that arises from plasma cells. 

It affects 24,000 people in the UK at any one time and about 4,500 people are diagnosed annually.

It mainly affects those over the age of 65, however, it has been diagnosed in people much younger. 

Myeloma develops when DNA is damaged during the development of a plasma cell. 

The abnormal cell multiplies and spreads within the bone marrow and releases one type of antibody – known as paraprotein – which has no useful function. This can cause the bones to easily break.

Myeloma affects where bone marrow is normally active in an adult, such as in the bones of the spine, skull, pelvis, rib cage, long bones of the arms and legs and the areas around the shoulders and hips. 

The most common symptoms include:

  • Bone pain
  • Fatigue
  • Recurring infection
  • Kidney damage
  • Peripheral neuropathy

 Source: Myeloma UK

 

He rang his wife Emma, 49, and explained he needed to get to hospital urgently.

Once at A&E, doctors looked at Mr Windle’s MRI scans and asked if he had been in a car crash or had any trauma. He said: ‘They all looked a bit worried.’

He spent a fortnight in the hospital’s spinal unit, undergoing several scans and blood tests.

Recalling the day he found out his diagnosis, Mr Windle said: ‘I had decided to go for my daily walk from my bed on the hospital ward, so I’d struggled into the back brace I had to wear and set off for my circuit of the hospital.

‘I was on the ninth floor, so I’d got into the habit of walking up and down the stairs to keep fit.

‘But on the way out the ward I walked past the space where the doctors and nurses gathered around the computers. I heard a doctor chatting to a nurse and I heard him saying, “well, myeloma at 44, that’s a bit s***, isn’t it?”

‘I just thought, “yes that does sound a bit s***”… “oh s*** I think they’re talking about me”. So I sort of backed away, just out of their view, and I listened, I listened to them talk about it. And I thought, okay, that is me. That’s my diagnosis.’

Myeloma is an incurable blood cancer which strikes around 6,000 Brits every year. It develops from plasma cells in bone marrow – the spongy tissue inside large bones – multiplying uncontrollably.

Symptoms can be difficult to distinguish from other illnesses, with pain and fatigue being tell-tale signs of the illness.

Mr Windle was diagnosed with a rare type of myeloma called ‘light chain’ myeloma, which only affects about 20 per cent of patients with the blood cancer. Because of its characteristics, it can be even harder to detect.

For Mr Windle, the cancerous cells cluttered up his bone marrow, meaning it didn’t make the useful cells that make and regenerate the bone, causing his vertebrae to disintegrate, doctors believe. 

Mr Windle added: ‘As soon as I was in the treatment pathway, everybody acted very quickly. 

‘There’s no one looking at a 44-year-old man who goes to the gym runs, cycles and is fit. No-one’s thinking this is an incurable cancer.

‘The only issue is people aren’t aware of myeloma or looking for it. I had to wait for my spine to fall apart before I had any sort of test to reveal what it is.’

Once his results came back he had a bone marrow biopsy, which involves a needle being stuck into the pelvis.  

Mr Windle, pictured wearing his back brace was diagnosed with a rare type of myeloma called 'light chain' myeloma, which only affects about 20 per cent of patients with the blood cancer

Mr Windle, pictured wearing his back brace was diagnosed with a rare type of myeloma called 'light chain' myeloma, which only affects about 20 per cent of patients with the blood cancer

Mr Windle, pictured wearing his back brace was diagnosed with a rare type of myeloma called ‘light chain’ myeloma, which only affects about 20 per cent of patients with the blood cancer

Mr Windle said: ‘I had to wait six weeks to find out what stage my myeloma was. 

‘But the good news I had in that first two months was the myeloma was officially standard.’

He had four months of chemo and was given the cancer-fighting drug bortezomib alongside tablets of the steroid dexamethasone.

Mr Windle added: ‘I was already emotionally all over the shop and dexamethasone heightens your emotions, I was crazy, I was really devastated and struggling. 

‘I couldn’t be at home I just used to go out and walk around the streets crying every night.’

But eventually his dose of dexamethasone was reduced which helped his symptoms and ‘made a huge difference’. 

Me Windle admits his young children Sylvie, 9 and Otis, 6, pictured with his friend James Harvey still don't really understand his Myeloma diagnosis

Me Windle admits his young children Sylvie, 9 and Otis, 6, pictured with his friend James Harvey still don't really understand his Myeloma diagnosis

Me Windle admits his young children Sylvie, 9 and Otis, 6, pictured with his friend James Harvey still don’t really understand his Myeloma diagnosis 

After a two month break from medication, in November 2022 Mr Windle had a stem cell transplant followed by two more months of the same treatment. 

Now, Mr Windle is taking the cancer drug lenalidomide and zoledronic acid, which can prevent problems with the bones caused by the myeloma. 

Recalling how he broke the news of his diagnosis to his family, he admits his young children still don’t really understand. 

Mr Windle, whose life is almost ‘back to how it was before’, said: ‘I told all my adult friends and family but my kids still don’t really know. 

‘They just knew at the time I had had a really bad back and I had to go to hospital. I was in hospital for Sylvie’s seventh birthday, so that was pretty rubbish.

Mr Windle has since found 'hope' by building a community of friends with myeloma who also have the blood cancer and have had it for 10 to 20 years. Here, he is pictured with his friends Chris Buckingham (left) , James Harvey (centre) and Neil Gordon (right) who is currently running 1000Km to raise money for Myeloma UK

Mr Windle has since found 'hope' by building a community of friends with myeloma who also have the blood cancer and have had it for 10 to 20 years. Here, he is pictured with his friends Chris Buckingham (left) , James Harvey (centre) and Neil Gordon (right) who is currently running 1000Km to raise money for Myeloma UK

Mr Windle has since found ‘hope’ by building a community of friends with myeloma who also have the blood cancer and have had it for 10 to 20 years. Here, he is pictured with his friends Chris Buckingham (left) , James Harvey (centre) and Neil Gordon (right) who is currently running 1000Km to raise money for Myeloma UK

‘The weeks I got diagnosed were the weeks I was supposed to be interviewing for a headteacher job. 

‘But I don’t go for that anymore, I don’t have the energy. I am trying my best but I can’t keep going, it’s very demanding work. 

‘The main issue is you are just always wondering when it is going to come back. It doesn’t go away it comes back for everyone.’

It can be months or years before the myeloma becomes active again, but at some point patients do relapse, according to Myeloma UK. 

It comes after UK health chiefs this week approved Nexpovio, a cancer treatment designed for myeloma patients who have become resistant to other drugs. 

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International

Revealed: Ferrari are DITCHING their iconic red colour – with a surprising switch coming to Formula One in Miami next month

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  • Ferrari will ditch their traditional red livery in Miami 
  • The Scuderia cars will be decked out in blue for the race weekend
  • The special livery celebrates Ferrari’s 70-year presence in North America 

Ferrari will ditch their traditional red livery for ‘fresh and unexpected colours’ at the Miami Grand Prix next month.

The Scuderia cars will be decked in blue for the race weekend to celebrate the 70th anniversary of Ferrari’s presence in North America.

The design change will be a one-off and will feature two shades of blue – Azzurro La Plata and Azzurro Dino – in place of the traditional Rosso Corsa, the red livery synonymous with the Scuderia.

Azzurro La Plata – a lighter shade of blue, similar to that featured on Argentina’s national flag – is a nod to the colour worn by the legendary Alberto Ascari.

The Italian, Ferrari’s first Formula One world champion, wore a blue racing suit and a blue helmet as he stormed to the title in 1952 and 1953.

Ferrari will ditch its traditional red livery for the Miami Grand Prix next month

Ferrari last raced in blue and white at the US and Mexican Grand Prix at the end of the 1964 season, in which John Surtees won the title

Ferrari last raced in blue and white at the US and Mexican Grand Prix at the end of the 1964 season, in which John Surtees won the title

Ferrari last raced in blue and white at the US and Mexican Grand Prix at the end of the 1964 season, in which John Surtees won the title

Ascari was a trailblazer for Ferrari drivers, with John Surtees, Chris Amon, Lorenzo Bandini and Ludovico Scarfiotti all wearing light blue racing suits during the 1960s.

Ferrari last ditched its traditional red back in 1964, when it was replaced by a white and blue livery for the final two rounds of the championship – the US GP at Watkins Glen and the Mexican GP in Mexico City. 

And Surtees became the only Ferrari driver to win a Formula One world title in a colour other than red, as he finished second in Mexico to pip Graham Hill to the title by a point.

The late Niki Lauda also donned the colour on his debut season with Ferrari in 1974, before switching to red the following season.

The livery was also used on other Ferrari racing cars by the North American Racing Team, which was founded in 1958 to promote the marque in the US and mostly competed in endurance racing. 

Azzurro Dino, meanwhile, is a darker shade of blue, which was most recently worn by the late Clay Regazzoni in 1974, before Ferrari drivers regularly began wearing Rosso Corsa suits.

Surtees wore a light blue, known as Azzurro La Plata, racing suit throughout his time at Ferrari

Surtees wore a light blue, known as Azzurro La Plata, racing suit throughout his time at Ferrari

Surtees wore a light blue, known as Azzurro La Plata, racing suit throughout his time at Ferrari

Niki Lauda wore a blue racing suit in his debut season with Ferrari in 1974

Niki Lauda wore a blue racing suit in his debut season with Ferrari in 1974

Niki Lauda wore a blue racing suit in his debut season with Ferrari in 1974

Clay Regazzoni wore a darker shade of blue, known as Azzurro Dino, in the same season

Clay Regazzoni wore a darker shade of blue, known as Azzurro Dino, in the same season

Clay Regazzoni wore a darker shade of blue, known as Azzurro Dino, in the same season

The monicker Dino is a homage to Enzo Ferrari’s first son Alfredo – who was nicknamed Dino – and died aged 24.

The special livery that will adorn the SF-24 cars is to be revealed in Florida in the build-up to the Miami race, as part of a week-long celebration of Ferrari’s presence in North America.

While a launch date is yet to be announced, the Scuderia have released a video of Charles Leclerc and Carlos Sainz donning the light blue racing suits on Instagram and X, the platform previously known as Twitter.

Ferrari unveiled a one-off livery at the Las Vegas GP last season to pay homage to its old red and white colour scheme

Ferrari unveiled a one-off livery at the Las Vegas GP last season to pay homage to its old red and white colour scheme

Ferrari unveiled a one-off livery at the Las Vegas GP last season to pay homage to its old red and white colour scheme 

The Miami GP will mark the second time in as many years Ferrari have unveiled a one-off colour change for a race in the US. 

Last season, the Scuderia ran a red and white livery at the Las Vegas GP, to pay tribute to one of its iconic colour schemes of the past.

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International

Former Labour minister Frank Field dies aged 81: Crossbench peer passes away following two-year battle with terminal cancer

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Former Labour minister and crossbench peer Frank Field has died aged 81 following a two-year battle with terminal cancer.

The veteran politician who served as an MP for Birkenhead for 40 years and as the minister of reform under Tony Blair’s government was well respected across the parliament benches. 

He joined the House of Lords in 2020 as a crossbench peer after serving as an MP since 1979

A statement from Lord Field of Birkenhead’s family, issued by his Parliamentary officem, read: ‘Frank Field has died at the age of 81 following a period of illness.

‘Frank is survived by two brothers.’

Former Labour minister and crossbench peer Frank Field has died aged 81

Former Labour minister and crossbench peer Frank Field has died aged 81

Former Labour minister and crossbench peer Frank Field has died aged 81

Frank Field quite the Labour whip in 2018 after he had a row with then leader Jeremy Corbyn

Frank Field quite the Labour whip in 2018 after he had a row with then leader Jeremy Corbyn

Frank Field quite the Labour whip in 2018 after he had a row with then leader Jeremy Corbyn 

Lord Field (pictured in 1973) served as an MP for 40 years from 1979 to 2019 before joining the House of Lords in 2020

Lord Field (pictured in 1973) served as an MP for 40 years from 1979 to 2019 before joining the House of Lords in 2020

Lord Field (pictured in 1973) served as an MP for 40 years from 1979 to 2019 before joining the House of Lords in 2020

Tributes have been flowing for the much-love politician since the news broke, with former home secretary Priti Patel MP he was a ‘kind and compassionate man and a great Parliamentarian’.

She wrote on X: ‘My thoughts and prayers are with the family of Frank Field. Frank was a kind and compassionate man and a great Parliamentarian. 

‘His unwavering moral compass, commitment to working cross-party and unshakable principles defined him and will be greatly missed.’

Piers Morgan said: ‘RIP Frank Field, one of the most genuinely principled, decent, intelligent & caring politicians Britain’s ever had.’

Labour MP for Kent, Rosie Duffield said: ‘RIP dear Frank Field. He was a wonderful Chair of the Work and Pensions Select Committee, compassionate and incredibly kind with a great sense of humour and always a twinkle in his eye…’

In October 2021, it was revealed in the House of Lords that veteran politician has recently spent time in a hospice and that he was not well enough to attend debates.

Throughout his career, Lord Field built a reputation an one of the most effective backbenchers with curbs on EU immigration and campaigns against poverty. 

In 2018, he quit the Labour whip in Parliament after a row with then leader Jeremy Corbyn, who he said was’ a force for anti-Semitism in British politics.

The Conservatives made him a non-affiliated crossbench peer by the Conservative government in 2020 after he campaigned in favour of Brexit. 

Back in October 2021, the former minister revealed he was terminally will as he urged the House of Lords to ease the law to allow assisted dying. 

At the time, Lord Field was too ill to attend Parliament as peers debated changing legislation to enable adults with no hope of recovery to legally seek assistance to end their lives. 

In a message read out in the House of Lords at the time, he admitted he had spent time in a hospice and urged them to change the law, citing a friend who had gone through the ‘full horror effects’ of cancer.

The news came as a shock to many in parliament at the time with Tory former housing secretary Robert Jenrick hailed him as ‘one of the politicians I have most admired and respected’.

Baroness Meacher read out the message from the peer, whom she said was ‘dying’, in which he said: ‘I changed my mind on assisted dying when an MP friend dying of cancer wanted to die early before the full horror effects set in, but was denied this opportunity.

Frank Field revealed to the House of Lords in October 2021 that he was diagnosed with a terminal illness

Frank Field revealed to the House of Lords in October 2021 that he was diagnosed with a terminal illness

Frank Field revealed to the House of Lords in October 2021 that he was diagnosed with a terminal illness

The veteran politician was well respected across parliament. Tory former housing secretary Robert Jenrick hailed him as 'one of the politicians I have most admired and respected'

The veteran politician was well respected across parliament. Tory former housing secretary Robert Jenrick hailed him as 'one of the politicians I have most admired and respected'

The veteran politician was well respected across parliament. Tory former housing secretary Robert Jenrick hailed him as ‘one of the politicians I have most admired and respected’

The Conservatives made Frank Field a non-affiliated crossbench peer by the Conservative government in 2020 after he campaigned in favour of Brexit

‘A major argument against the Bill is unfounded. It is thought by some the culture would change and that people would be pressured into ending their lives.

‘The number of assisted deaths in the US and Australia remains very low – under 1 per cent – and a former supreme court judge of Victoria, Australia, about pressure from relatives, said it just hasn’t been an issue.

‘I hope the House will today vote for the Assisted Dying Bill.’

In an interview in January last year, Lord Field said it was ‘a strange experience taking so long to die’.

He said: ‘I’m pretty tired. It’s a strange experience taking so long to die. But there we are. 

‘It’s affected my mouth, as you can see. It began about 10 years ago, when I was told I had prostate cancer. 

‘The hospital said, we must keep a watching brief on this. And they didn’t. It spread everywhere.’

Of his stay in hospice in 2021, Lord Field said he ‘expected to be gone in weeks’.

He said in January last year: ‘Yes, it was jolly good. They sorted out my medicines. And I wanted to go and see what the place was like. 

‘I expected to be gone then, within weeks. And the doctors that spoke to me did as well. But life has gone on.’

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International

US Senate passes $95 billion aid package for Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan

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The Senate has passed $95 billion in war aid to Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan, sending the legislation to President Joe Biden after months of delays and contentious debate over how involved the United States should be in foreign wars.

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