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L’armée soudanaise dit que des émissaires ont été envoyés en Arabie saoudite pour des pourparlers de trêve

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L’armée soudanaise a déclaré vendredi soir qu’elle avait envoyé des émissaires en Arabie saoudite pour discuter “des détails de la trêve en cours de prolongation” avec ses ennemis paramilitaires.

Le chef de l’armée régulière Abdel Fattah al-Burhan avait donné son soutien à un cessez-le-feu de sept jours annoncé par le Soudan du Sud mercredi, mais tôt vendredi, les Forces paramilitaires de soutien rapide ont annoncé qu’elles prolongeaient de trois jours une précédente trêve négociée sous la médiation américano-saoudienne. .

De multiples trêves ont été convenues depuis que les combats entre les forces de sécurité rivales ont éclaté le 15 avril, mais aucune n’a été respectée.


(AFP)

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🔴 Live: Spain, Ireland, Norway set to recognise Palestinian statehood

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Spain, Ireland and Norway will officially recognise a Palestinian state on Tuesday, despite an angry reaction from Israel, which has found itself increasingly isolated after seven months of conflict in Gaza. International condemnations over an Israeli strike that killed dozens in a displaced persons camp in Rafah have increased with the UN Security Council set to convene an emergency meeting on the incident on Tuesday. Follow our live blog for all the latest developments on the Israel-Hamas war. 

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Eamonn Holmes breaks silence on his divorce from wife Ruth Langsford as he thanks viewers for their support

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Eamonn Holmes has used his presenting slot on GB News’s breakfast programme to break his silence over his divorce from wife Ruth Langsford.

Accompanied by co-host Isabel Webster, who smiled supportively as he spoke, the TV veteran said: ‘Just before we move on we’d just like to thank people for your support for Ruth and I over the last few days as to the news of our separation.

‘Your support for both of us is very much appreciated.’

This is a breaking story – more to follow. 

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Papua New Guinea orders thousands to evacuate amid second landslide fears

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Thousands of residents were ordered to evacuate from the path of a still-active landslide in Papua New Guinea by the government on Tuesday, after parts of a mountain collapsed, burying an initial estimate of more than 2,000 people.

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Pennsylvania is sitting on major untapped lithium ‘white gold mine’ that could generate new billion-dollar industry, government study finds

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Pennsylvania could be at the center of America’s new ‘white gold rush’ with the discovery of a major untapped source of lithium in the state.

Government scientists have shown that they can filter the precious metal from the state’s shale gas wastewater: pulling tons of lithium per day, with little left behind.

They concluded that Pennsylvania alone could produce nearly half of the total US demand for lithium — starting in the first year — supplying this key compound that’s needed to power everything from smartphones to electric vehicles to solar panels.

A project on this scale could make Pennsylvania a rust-belt Saudi Arabia, ending US dependence on lithium from China, which now controls 90 percent of the market.

And unlike many new lithium-mining proposals, which have threatened scarce water resources from Arkansas to Colorado, this process would make a virtue of the high-pressure water already used by the hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, of natural gas.

With 72 proposed lithium mines across the US, the discovery could help reduce local ecological fallout as America shifts away from ‘greenhouse gas’-emitting fossil fuels. 

Over 1,200 tons of lithium could be recovered per year from Pennsylvania's natural gas 'fracking' wastewater alone, according to the new research, produced in collaboration by the US National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the University of Pittsburgh

Over 1,200 tons of lithium could be recovered per year from Pennsylvania's natural gas 'fracking' wastewater alone, according to the new research, produced in collaboration by the US National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the University of Pittsburgh

Over 1,200 tons of lithium could be recovered per year from Pennsylvania’s natural gas ‘fracking’ wastewater alone, according to the new research, produced in collaboration by the US National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the University of Pittsburgh

‘Wastewater from oil and gas is a burgeoning issue,’ as one government geochemist behind the new study put it. ‘We’re looking at a beneficial use of that waste.’

Fracking is a process used to extract natural gas from deep underground shale rock, via the injection of more than a million gallons of water, sand and chemicals at high pressure into drilled wells.

The pressurized mix cracks open the shale rock, creating new fissures that are held open by the sand, allowing natural gas from the rock to flow up into the well.

However, despite having reduced US dependence on foreign oil, fracking has proven to be highly controversial due to its use of chemicals, groundwater contamination, noise, air pollution and even its ability to create earthquake-like tremors.

And these risks have become a fiercely debated issue in Pennsylvania, where fracking has been linked to cancer other health issues.

Over 1,200 tons of lithium could be recovered per year from Pennsylvania’s fracking wastewater alone, according to the new research, produced in collaboration by the US National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the University of Pittsburgh.

Although the price of lithium has fluctuated in this volatile new market, the annual return to the state from this wastewater lithium could range from $1.6 to $18 million dollars at current prices

Although the price of lithium has fluctuated in this volatile new market, the annual return to the state from this wastewater lithium could range from $1.6 to $18 million dollars at current prices

Although the price of lithium has fluctuated in this volatile new market, the annual return to the state from this wastewater lithium could range from $1.6 to $18 million dollars at current prices

Fracking is the process of drilling down into the earth before inserting a high-pressure water mixture to release natural gas. Water, sand and chemicals are injected at high pressure into underground boreholes to open up cracks in the rock, freeing trapped natural gas

Fracking is the process of drilling down into the earth before inserting a high-pressure water mixture to release natural gas. Water, sand and chemicals are injected at high pressure into underground boreholes to open up cracks in the rock, freeing trapped natural gas

Fracking is the process of drilling down into the earth before inserting a high-pressure water mixture to release natural gas. Water, sand and chemicals are injected at high pressure into underground boreholes to open up cracks in the rock, freeing trapped natural gas

Although the price of lithium has fluctuated in this volatile new market, the annual return to the state could range from $1.6 to $18 million dollars at current prices.

More promising still, their projection that this wastewater recycling could meet nearly half of US lithium demand does not factor in any nearby activity other states.

The so-called Marcellus shale region, where an estimated 144 trillion cubic-feet of natural gas lays pocketed between two massive layers of limestone, covers much of Pennsylvania — but also extends into New York, Ohio, and West Virginia. 

‘Pennsylvania has the most robust data source for Marcellus shale,’ NETL geochemist Justin Mackey said in a statement. ‘But there’s lots of activity in West Virginia, too.’

Mackey and his colleagues were able to calculate the likely amount of lithium floating in solution in this fracking wastewater through contaminant reports that each oil and gas company in Pennsylvania is required to file with regulators.

‘Lithium is one of the substances they have to report,’ Mackie said. ‘That’s how we were able to conduct this regional analysis.’

Based on their estimates, published this April in the journal Scientific Reports, fracking wells in the southwestern portion of Pennsylvania appear to contain nearly twice as much lithium as wells elsewhere in the ‘Keystone state.’ 

Geochemist Justin Mackey and his colleagues were able to calculate the likely amount of lithium floating in solution in this fracking wastewater through contaminant reports that each oil and gas company in Pennsylvania is required to file with regulators

Geochemist Justin Mackey and his colleagues were able to calculate the likely amount of lithium floating in solution in this fracking wastewater through contaminant reports that each oil and gas company in Pennsylvania is required to file with regulators

Geochemist Justin Mackey and his colleagues were able to calculate the likely amount of lithium floating in solution in this fracking wastewater through contaminant reports that each oil and gas company in Pennsylvania is required to file with regulators

While geologists had long known that lithium was present in the mineral content around these shale gas deposits, an accurate estimation only became feasible as years of these mandated reports came in.  

‘There hadn’t been enough measurements to quantify the resource,’ Mackey explained. ‘We just didn’t know how much was in there.’

But an accidental benefit had occurred, because lithium-based mineral compounds like lithium chloride and lithium carbonate are water soluble. 

The simple act of injecting fracking wells with high-pressured water has acted to pull much of that lithium metal out of the rock and into the fracking wastewater.

Water in underground aquifers, as Mackey put it, have been ‘dissolving rocks for hundreds of millions of years.’

‘Essentially, the water has been mining the subsurface,’ he said.

America has about eight million metric tons of lithium in its land, which means the US industry is worth about $232 billion.

However, the nation only makes up about one percent of the global lithium production — while China has dominated the market for decades because 90 percent of the metal mined is refined in their nation.

But reckless exploitation of America’s lithium wealth could come at a grave cost, experts warn.

Approximately 40 of the 72 proposed lithium mines in the US are set for Nevada, America’s driest state, and 80 percent of them would sit on water supplies deemed at risk of low water levels, according to an analysis by the Howard Center for investigative journalism. 

Central Nevada Regional Water Authority Executive Director Jeff Fontaine told Howard Center researchers that overuse of water in the basin can cause ‘permanent’ damage underground and ‘a combination of things that happens that would prevent that aquifer from ever really restoring itself.’ 

Poor planning of such mines, the Howard Center noted, could hurt local communities and wildlife that need access to these aquifers’ fresh water.

Patrick Donnelly, a conservation biologist for the nonprofit Center for Biological Diversity, told the Howard Center that if all of the 72 proposed mines are constructed under the current rules, ‘it would be a fundamental transformation of the American West.’

‘People compare it to the Gold Rush, but the Gold Rush was pretty small scale, compared to what all this lithium’s looking like,’ Donnelly said.

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Boohoo facing shareholder revolt on bosses’ bonuses after tumbling to a £160m loss

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Bad look: Boohoo is facing a shareholder revolt over bosses' bonuses

Bad look: Boohoo is facing a shareholder revolt over bosses' bonuses

Bad look: Boohoo is facing a shareholder revolt over bosses’ bonuses

Boohoo is facing a shareholder revolt over plans to pay bosses bonuses despite losses. 

The fast fashion giant has been blasted after the £1million payouts were outlined in its yearly report despite missed financial targets. 

Several shareholders are planning to vote against proposals to hand co-founders Mahmud Kamani and Carol Kane and CEO John Lyttle bonuses at Boohoo’s annual general meeting next month, 

The Sunday Times reported. It comes after Boohoo revenue tumbled 17 per cent in its latest financial year, and it reported a loss of nearly £160million. 

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Pictured: The desert in China with so many tourist camel trains that TRAFFIC LIGHTS have been installed to allow pedestrians to pass between them

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As an unexpected location for congestion, a desert takes some beating.

Especially when it’s camels that are gridlocked.

But camel traffic jams are exactly what take place amid the dunes of Mingsha Mountain and Crescent Spring Scenic Spot in China.

The problem became so acute that local authorities dreamt up a unique, world-first solution to stop delayed tourists from getting the hump (as Brits sometimes describe becoming annoyed) – camel traffic lights. 

The unique system was installed in 2021 at the popular spot on the outskirts of Dunhuang City in northwest China’s Gansu province.

Camel traffic lights have been installed at Mingsha Mountain and Crescent Spring Scenic Spot

Camel traffic lights have been installed at Mingsha Mountain and Crescent Spring Scenic Spot

Camel traffic lights have been installed at Mingsha Mountain and Crescent Spring Scenic Spot 

The unique system was installed in 2021 at the popular spot on the outskirts of Dunhuang City in northwest China's Gansu province

The unique system was installed in 2021 at the popular spot on the outskirts of Dunhuang City in northwest China's Gansu province

The unique system was installed in 2021 at the popular spot on the outskirts of Dunhuang City in northwest China’s Gansu province 

The signals serve the same purpose as regular traffic lights and display the same traditional green pedestrian symbols on one side.

But on the other side, they show a distinctive image of a two-humped camel. 

Dozens of traffic lights were installed along the scenic route to allow pedestrians to cross in between long lines of camels. 

The signals serve the same purpose as regular traffic lights. They display the traditional green pedestrian symbols on one side, but an image of a two-humped camel on the other

The signals serve the same purpose as regular traffic lights. They display the traditional green pedestrian symbols on one side, but an image of a two-humped camel on the other

The signals serve the same purpose as regular traffic lights. They display the traditional green pedestrian symbols on one side, but an image of a two-humped camel on the other

The unique system at Mingsha Mountain (above) has itself become a tourist attraction

The unique system at Mingsha Mountain (above) has itself become a tourist attraction

The unique system at Mingsha Mountain (above) has itself become a tourist attraction

When the green camel light is on, camels can pass, and when the red camel light is on, camels stop to let pedestrians through. 

While the traffic lights have worked to speed up camel rides through the desert, it hasn’t made the area any less busy – the traffic lights have become a popular tourist attraction in themselves.

According to China Daily, Wang Youxia, deputy general manager of the company responsible for the scenic spot’s operations said that more than 3.7million tourists visited last year, with 42 per cent of those opting for camel rides. 

The scenic area is home to around 2,000 camels, each transporting multiple tourists a day, according to the website. 

The camel rides are operated by local villagers, who charge around 100 yuan (£12/$14) per tourist for an hour-long camel trek. 

The scenic area is home to around 2,000 camels, each transporting multiple tourists a day

The scenic area is home to around 2,000 camels, each transporting multiple tourists a day

The scenic area is home to around 2,000 camels, each transporting multiple tourists a day

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I thought my anxiety was genetic, says MISTY PRATT. Then I discovered why so many women are diagnosed with depression and given pills they don’t need

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Aged just 17, I got sick. The kind of sick doctors can’t diagnose using a blood test or a scan; the kind of illness that’s talked about in whispers, behind closed doors, if it were even talked about at all.

It started on my first morning back to school after a blissful summer. I clearly remember walking through the school hall and everything suddenly seeming grey and bleak.

Today, I know this was my first experience of the terrible weight of depression.

At the time, though, I didn’t recognise the darkness for what it truly was, which wasn’t helped by the rapid onslaught of ailments seemingly contained in my body, not my mind.

Headaches, stomach aches, irritable bowel syndrome, insomnia and panic attacks: all these physical symptoms crept into my life one at a time. I couldn’t get on buses or trains or go into any other place where I felt confined, because my panic revolved around my intense nausea and a fear of vomiting.

'Headaches, stomach aches, irritable bowel syndrome, insomnia and panic attacks: all these physical symptoms crept into my life one at a time,' says Misty Pratt

'Headaches, stomach aches, irritable bowel syndrome, insomnia and panic attacks: all these physical symptoms crept into my life one at a time,' says Misty Pratt

‘Headaches, stomach aches, irritable bowel syndrome, insomnia and panic attacks: all these physical symptoms crept into my life one at a time,’ says Misty Pratt

I visited specialists who pressed on my abdomen and stuck a scope down my oesophagus, on the hunt for a physical cause of my tummy troubles. All tests came back negative for serious illness.

‘You need to reduce stress,’ one doctor said, and I nodded in agreement, unsure how to do that. My body’s internal smoke alarm was beeping, but I couldn’t find the source of the fire.

I took to popping Zantac, a medication used to reduce stomach acid, every time I felt the familiar stab in my abdomen.

Soon it was a daily habit. My weight dropped rapidly and I began to isolate myself. Schoolwork was the only thing tying me to some sense of normality.

My depression lasted for years. Eventually I ended up taking antidepressants.

At first, the drugs helped — but the positive effects soon wore off, leaving me with side-effects like an involuntary twitch and a diminished libido, which thankfully resolved after I painstakingly weaned myself off the medication.

By the age of 35, I had received five different diagnoses from five different doctors.

What started as ‘panic’, became ‘generalised anxiety’, then morphed into an eating disorder, was revised as ‘cyclothymia’ — a condition that shares many similarities with bipolar disorder — and culminated in a bout of ‘postpartum mood disorder’.

Indeed, my mental illness lasted through my two pregnancies — my first at 29, my second three years later — and beyond, as my children grew into beautiful young girls.

And the cause of all this?

At first I presumed it was, as the phrase puts it, ‘all in my head’, some kind of genetic legacy gifted to me by my paternal grandmother, who suffered from manic episodes.

I had witnessed them from the age of five. She would have grandiose ideas, like falling in love with someone she barely knew, or make epic shopping sprees that tallied in the thousands. On other occasions, she experienced complete breakdowns and lost the ability to speak.

Later, I learned the curse of mental illness had touched the lives of at least two other women in my family tree, both following childbirth. My paternal great-grandmother stayed in a so-called ‘nursing home’ after the birth of her third child.

Even more tragic was the story of my grandmother’s sister, who died by suicide shortly after the birth of twins.

I suppose I also thought it was a ‘woman thing’, or some sort of chemical imbalance in my brain that just needed ‘righting’.

But today I know, thanks to years of research — both in my job as a health researcher and also by speaking to mental health experts and other sufferers — that women’s mental illness is far more complex than these two often-cited explanations would make you think.

Indeed, many scientists believe the minute intricacies of our female bodies, the complex ebb and flow of our hormones — not to mention the pressurised, multi-tasking world in which women live and work — are absolutely vital to unpick if we are ever truly to tackle female ‘problems of the mind’.

Yet as one professor of psychiatry — Jayashri Kulkarni, a specialist in women’s mental health at Monash University, Australia — told me wearily, ‘psychiatry remains primitive’ in how it diagnoses and treats problems like mine.

You might wonder why I am writing so specifically just about women here. It’s because I’m far from alone. As one of the first doctors I saw as a teenager said, while sighing and shaking his head: ‘Why are so many girls dealing with things like this?’

The reality is that women make up the bulk of mental health patients. Today, women are three times more likely than men to experience common mental health problems.

In England in 2014, one in six adults had a common mental health problem; about one in five women and one in eight men.

While rates of severe mental illness have remained steady over time, and don’t differ much by gender, more common disorders, including depression and anxiety, certainly reflect a gender difference.

Women are approximately twice as likely as men to be diagnosed with depression, according to data published in 2011.

Adapted from All In Her Head: How Gender Bias Harms Women's Mental Health, by Misty Pratt, to be published by Greystone on June 6

Adapted from All In Her Head: How Gender Bias Harms Women's Mental Health, by Misty Pratt, to be published by Greystone on June 6

Adapted from All In Her Head: How Gender Bias Harms Women’s Mental Health, by Misty Pratt, to be published by Greystone on June 6

It’s also notable that half of all serious mental illness begins in adolescence — and girls far outweigh boys among the diagnosed.

Between the ages of 12 and 17, more than 36 per cent of girls develop depression, compared with less than 14 per cent of boys. And once mental illness begins in adolescence, it often persists throughout a person’s adult life.

Add to this the fact that statistics show when a woman presents at her doctor’s office with complaints of anxiety or a depressive mood, she is also almost twice as likely, compared with men, to be prescribed psychotropic medication, such as antidepressants — and you can see we have a problem.

Finally, once a woman is on medication, research seems to indicate that it’s hard to stop taking them. In a study in 2017, researchers in Sweden found it was twice as common for women as for men to use antidepressants when they were not currently depressed.

These findings suggest women are being overtreated with these drugs.

Surely, given all the amazing medical advances that are possible in our technologically proficient age, we can do better than our current method of treatment — doling out antidepressants, and crossing our fingers that they do the trick?

Part of the problem, sadly, is that we often still treat women, medically, on the same basis as we do men, ignoring glaringly important differences between us.

One 2016 report in The Lancet Psychiatry cited some of these differences as including: women’s diminished stress response (we are more likely to release less cortisol during stressful events, which is associated with a higher risk of subsequent depression even after the event has passed); the fact that women are more likely to have lower self-esteem and higher risk for rumination (meaning being stuck in a cycle of negative thoughts) and body-related shame — and also that women suffer higher rates of traumatic childhood experiences, such as physical and sexual abuse.

Yet the thresholds and treatment of mental health issues are not gender specific.

And aside from diagnosis, clinical research to study the effectiveness of antidepressants and their potential harms has, historically, mostly been in male animals and adult male humans — which means that much of what we know about their side-effects relates to the male body.

Little wonder, perhaps, that one 2020 report in the journal Biology of Sex Differences found worrying implications for how women process standard prescribed doses of antidepressants.

‘Among patients administered a standard drug dose,’ the report said, ‘females are exposed to higher blood drug concentrations and longer drug elimination times than males.

‘This likely contributes to the near doubling of adverse drug reactions in female patients, raising the possibility that women are routinely overmedicated.’

Dr Liisa Galea, a world-renowned neuroscientist, now at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto, Canada, found that only five per cent of studies from neuroscience and psychiatry journals in 2019 used an appropriate analysis for the discovery of possible sex differences in the outcomes.

When women are included in trials, variables such as hormonal contraceptives, menstrual cycles (which means differing responses to medication at different points in our cycles), pregnancy, childbirth and menopause have been found to affect treatment outcomes.

But these variables sometimes lead researchers to exclude women from participating in research altogether, in the belief that it’s just too difficult to incorporate them in their findings.

This is despite the fact that, as Dr Galea tells me: ‘Pregnancy and postpartum do create a perfect storm for mental health disorders, because we see the same kind of biomarkers occurring during those stages that we see in mental health problems.’

In depression, there is a reduction in volume of the hippocampus, a part of the brain that’s involved in memory, for instance.

As Dr Galea points out, the same reduction occurs in pregnancy and postpartum.

Other major changes in this same timeframe affect our immune system, stress hormones and metabolism — all in ways similar to what we see during an episode of major depression.

This gender bias in the diagnosis and treatment of women’s mental illness just further medicalises natural processes in our bodies and pathologises our emotions.

Those pesky wombs and changing hormones affect our moods — of course they do! — but that shouldn’t automatically lead doctors to focus on women’s emotions and dole out antidepressants and ignore other serious health issues that may be going on.

Part of the answer, surely, must be in precision medicine, rather like that we are seeing in cancer care and cardiology.

‘We need the ECG for the mind,’ says Kulkarni, referring to the test that checks heart function by measuring its electrical activity. Indeed, it seems there are in fact ways emerging to define what type of mental health disorder women have.

Professor Kulkarni identifies different types of depression based on factors such as hormonal changes or a history of trauma, which would impact the stress response system and thereby change brain chemistry over the long-term.

Other researchers have studied blood tests that could identify whether a person was experiencing a depression associated with inflammation in the body. Meanwhile, research suggests that more than 50 per cent of the variance of antidepressant response and tolerability is genetically controlled.

New genetic tests — embryonic though they are — show some early promise in predicting antidepressant treatment response and remission rates.

Taken together, these advancements provide hope for those women who have found antidepressants have not been the ‘happy pills’ we were promised.

But the missing piece of the puzzle, as I can testify, is that women desperately require holistic care, as well as sound biologically based medical care — particularly at moments of hormonal change, such as adolescence, pregnancy and menopause.

It’s at times like these that overburdened women can feel TATT — ‘tired all the time’. But this feeling of being worn out is all-too-often diagnosed as anxiety or depression.

When this happens, treatment solutions may prove ineffective, leading to worsening symp- toms or an abandonment of treatment altogether.

That’s because treatment for mental illness generally centres on therapy and medication, while treatment for burnout needs more practical solutions — such as time off work to rest; negotiating different working hours with an employer or encouraging basic self-care, such as getting a good night’s sleep and taking exercise.

There is even evidence that women should try to see that some bumps in the road could, in the end, be positive for our mental health.

According to Dr Galea, the structural changes we see in the brain during puberty, pregnancy and menopause ‘might even be better for you’, she says.

For instance, research on brain changes that occur during adolescence shows that grey matter in the prefrontal cortex begins to thin.

This is an important process of pruning unwanted neural connections in the brain, while the connections that remain are strengthened.

In pregnancy, brain volume changes may help us to feel more bonded to our babies.

And images of our brains during menopause have shown changes in its structure, neural connectivity and energy metabolism which have the potential to make women more vulnerable to mental health issues — or, instead, make us more resilient to change and better able to adapt.

All these changes are likely serving a functional purpose, helping us transition into the next stage of life.

For me, making peace with my moods and coming to the realisation that there’s nothing I need to ‘fix’ about myself helped me to recover.

But long term, it’s only with more research dedicated specifically to women’s bodies and minds — in all their complex glory — that we may ever fully tackle the idea that our mental health woes really are just ‘all in our heads’.

Adapted from All In Her Head: How Gender Bias Harms Women’s Mental Health, by Misty Pratt, to be published by Greystone on June 6, £18.99. © Misty Pratt 2024. To order a copy for £17.09 (offer valid to June 8, 2024; UK P&P free on orders over £25), go to mailshop.co.uk/books or call 020 3176 2937.

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Indiana Pacers honor Bill Walton ahead of Celtics playoff game after ex-Boston center’s death at 71

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The Indiana Pacers paid tribute to Bill Walton before their playoff game against the Celtics on Monday night after the former Boston center’s death at 71.

Walton, who won the NBA Championship with the Celtics in 1986, died while surrounded by his family on Monday following a battle with cancer.

He was a two-time NBA champion, winning his first title with the Portland Trail Blazers before adding another in Boston.

The ex-UCLA star was also one of the greatest college basketball players of all time, winning three consecutive national college player of the year awards between 1972 and 1974 and two NCAA titles with the Bruins. 

Ahead of their Game 4 battle with Boston at Gainbridge Fieldhouse, Indiana held a moment of silence to remember Walton following his death on Monday.

The Indiana Pacers paid tribute to Bill Walton before their playoff game against the Celtics

The Indiana Pacers paid tribute to Bill Walton before their playoff game against the Celtics

The Indiana Pacers paid tribute to Bill Walton before their playoff game against the Celtics

Walton won the NBA Championship with Boston

Walton won the NBA Championship with Boston
The 71-year-old passed away on Monday

The 71-year-old passed away on Monday

Ex-Celtics center Walton (left, playing for Boston in 1985) died while surrounded his family on Monday following a battle with cancer

Walton’s NBA career – disrupted by chronic foot injuries – lasted only 468 games with Portland, the San Diego and eventually the Los Angeles Clippers and Boston. He averaged 13.3 points and 10.5 rebounds in those games.

His most famous game was the 1973 NCAA title game, UCLA against Memphis, in which he shot an incredible 21 for 22 from the field and led the Bruins to another national championship. 

Walton was selected with the No. 1 pic in the 1974 NBA draft, and won his first NBA Championship with the Trail Blazers three years later. He was the NBA’s MVP in the 1977-78 season.

After struggling with those foot problems, Walton’s career took off again when he was traded to the Celtics for Cedric Maxwell in 1985 for two seasons. Alongside Larry Bird, Walton collected his second NBA Championship in 1986.

After retiring, he overcame a stutter to thrive on the microphone, winning a Sports Emmy in 1991 and being named one of the top 50 sports broadcasters of all-time in 2009. 

Walton originally joined ESPN and ABC in 2002 as a lead analyst for NBA games before moving to college basketball in 2012. 

Pacers coach Rick Carlisle took part in a moment of silence for Walton before Monday's game

Pacers coach Rick Carlisle took part in a moment of silence for Walton before Monday's game

Pacers coach Rick Carlisle took part in a moment of silence for Walton before Monday’s game

Walton (right) was part of the Boston Celtics team that won the NBA Championship in 1986

Walton (right) was part of the Boston Celtics team that won the NBA Championship in 1986

Walton (right) was part of the Boston Celtics team that won the NBA Championship in 1986

After his playing career, he moved into the commentary box and won a Sports Emmy in 1991

After his playing career, he moved into the commentary box and won a Sports Emmy in 1991

After his playing career, he moved into the commentary box and won a Sports Emmy in 1991

Larry Bird (center) was one of many who paid tribute to his former Celtics teammate (left)

Larry Bird (center) was one of many who paid tribute to his former Celtics teammate (left)

Larry Bird (center) was one of many who paid tribute to his former Celtics teammate (left)

During a lengthy broadcasting career, he also worked for CBS and NBC.

Tributes poured in for Walton following the news of his death on Monday, including from former Celtics teammate Bird. 

‘I am very sorry about my good friend, Bill Walton,’ Bird said. ‘I love him as a friend and teammate. It was a thrill for me to play with my childhood idol and together we earned an NBA Championship in 1986. He is one of the greatest ever to play the game.

‘I am sure that all of my teammates are as grateful as I am that we were able to know Bill, he was such a joy to know and he will be sorely missed. My family and I extend our sincere condolences to the Walton family.’

Former US President Barack Obama took to social media to pay his respects to Walton, branding him ‘one of the greatest basketball players of all time’.

‘Bill Walton was one of the greatest basketball players of all time – a champion at every level and the embodiment of unselfish team play,’ Obama wrote. 

Former US President Barack Obama took to social media to pay his respects to Walton

Former US President Barack Obama took to social media to pay his respects to Walton

Former US President Barack Obama took to social media to pay his respects to Walton

Walton and former teammates Kevin McHale (left) and Danny Ainge (right) being honored by the Celtics in 2016

Walton and former teammates Kevin McHale (left) and Danny Ainge (right) being honored by the Celtics in 2016

Walton and former teammates Kevin McHale (left) and Danny Ainge (right) being honored by the Celtics in 2016

The NBA Hall of Famer is survived by his wife Lori and sons Adam, Nate, Luke and Chris

The NBA Hall of Famer is survived by his wife Lori and sons Adam, Nate, Luke and Chris

The NBA Hall of Famer is survived by his wife Lori and sons Adam, Nate, Luke and Chris

‘He was also a wonderful spirit full of curiosity, humor and kindness. We are poorer for his passing, and Michelle and I send our deepest condolences to his family.’

Fellow NBA legend, Julius Erving, also shared a snap of himself with Walton.

‘I am sad today hearing that my comrade & one of the sports worlds most beloved champions & characters has passed,’ he wrote on X.  

‘Bill Walton enjoyed life in every way. To compete against him & to work with him was a blessing in my life. Sorry for your loss Walton family. We’ll miss him too. Doc.’ 

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International

Britain braces for one of the wettest summers on record as the Met Office ‘warns the Government 50 days of rain is possible over holiday period’

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Britain is bracing itself for one of the wettest summers on record – with forecasters predicting there could be at least 50 days of rain in just three months.

The Government has reportedly been prepped by the Met Office to expect soggy conditions between June and the end of August, with wet weather 50 per cent more likely than average.

The bleak forecast threatens to interrupt a number of summer events, including Wimbledon, the British Grand Prix, the Trooping of the Colour, Royal Ascot, Henley and music festivals such as Glastonbury.

If forecasters are correct, it could be the dampest summer since 1912 – when rain fell on 55 days across the summer season, The Sun reports.

The Met Office long-range forecast said: ‘The chances of a wetter-than-average period are higher than a drier-than-average one.

People are seen wadding back to their homes in Wynyard, County Durham, on Bank Holiday Monday

People are seen wadding back to their homes in Wynyard, County Durham, on Bank Holiday Monday

People are seen wadding back to their homes in Wynyard, County Durham, on Bank Holiday Monday

Members of the public shelter under umbrellas the RHS Chelsea Flower Show at the Royal Hospital Chelsea in London last week

Members of the public shelter under umbrellas the RHS Chelsea Flower Show at the Royal Hospital Chelsea in London last week

Members of the public shelter under umbrellas the RHS Chelsea Flower Show at the Royal Hospital Chelsea in London last week

‘Rainfall at this time of year has a greater risk of localised heavy downpours and thunderstorms.’

Low pressure systems have been blamed by forecasters as the reason for the wet summer.

It comes after the Met Office revealed April was the sixth wettest since records dating to 1836.

In all, there was 55 per cent more rainfall than the long term average, the forecasting body said.

Last year was also a summer washout, with showers striking on 40 days. There has to be 2.5mm of rain within 24 hours for it to be classed as a rainy day.

Over the Bank Holiday weekend, Brits were hit with similarly unsettled weather as sunny spells were interrupted by showers.

Some areas saw extremely heavy rain, including Wynyard, County Durham, which experienced flooding.

The unsettled weather is set to last all week, with the southwest of the UK set for patchy rain on Monday night. 

Roads in the Romford area in the London Borough of Havering were flooded last week

Roads in the Romford area in the London Borough of Havering were flooded last week

Roads in the Romford area in the London Borough of Havering were flooded last week

Weather Commuters attempt to shelter from the rain as they cross London Bridge during rainy weather last week

Weather Commuters attempt to shelter from the rain as they cross London Bridge during rainy weather last week

Weather Commuters attempt to shelter from the rain as they cross London Bridge during rainy weather last week

Motorists navigate through wet conditions on the M5 northbound last week

Motorists navigate through wet conditions on the M5 northbound last week

Motorists navigate through wet conditions on the M5 northbound last week

Commuters stand in the pouring rain as they wait for trains in Greenwich, south east London, last week

Commuters stand in the pouring rain as they wait for trains in Greenwich, south east London, last week

Commuters stand in the pouring rain as they wait for trains in Greenwich, south east London, last week

A dog wrapped up in a full length coat as protection from the pouring rain last week

A dog wrapped up in a full length coat as protection from the pouring rain last week

A dog wrapped up in a full length coat as protection from the pouring rain last week

A flooded field in Warwickshire last week. Britain is set to face yet another miserable summer of rain

A flooded field in Warwickshire last week. Britain is set to face yet another miserable summer of rain

A flooded field in Warwickshire last week. Britain is set to face yet another miserable summer of rain

On Tuesday, Brits living in the north and east are set for a bright start, though cloud and rain across the southwest could move northwards during the day. 

For the rest of the week, there will be a mix of sunny spells and scattered showers – some of which will be heavy, with hail and thunder, according to the Met Office.  

Despite the rain threatening to ruin the Bank Holiday weekends, the sunny spells enabled families to flock to beauty spots including Durdle Door on Monday.

Families and groups of friends packed out the popular spot on the Jurassic Coast, basking in the sunshine and going for a dip in the sea.

Others made the most of the intermittent spells of sun by flocking to Cullercoats Bay in North Tyneside, while the annual cheese rolling festival in Gloucester attracted hundreds of dairy-loving thrill-seekers.

Families also faced having their Bank Holiday plans ruined after trains were suspended, ferry passengers faced two-hour waits and more than three million drivers hit the roads.

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International

Billion-dollar mission to explore ‘holy grail of shipwrecks’ at bottom of the Caribbean

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The ‘holy grail’ of shipwrecks remains at the bottom of the ocean stocked with billions of gold and jewels – but the Colombian government has claimed it for itself.

The legendary San Jose galleon, which sank off Colombia’s Caribbean coast over three centuries ago, is believed to hold $20 billion in gold, silver and emeralds.

Colombia declared the site a ‘protected archeological area’ and has now launched an undersea expedition to assess ‘long-term preservation and the development of research, conservation and valuation activities’ needed to secure the historic find.

The first stage of this process will focus on imaging the ship via ‘non-intrusive’ remote sensors, according to the Colombian Institute of Anthropology and History.

The institute added that results of this fact-finding mission could pave the way for future explorations, which could recover archaeological materials from the wreck.

The equipment used for searching of the remains of the galleon San Jose submerged almost 3,100 feet under the Colombian Caribbean Sea. It was operated by naval officials

The equipment used for searching of the remains of the galleon San Jose submerged almost 3,100 feet under the Colombian Caribbean Sea. It was operated by naval officials

The equipment used for searching of the remains of the galleon San Jose submerged almost 3,100 feet under the Colombian Caribbean Sea. It was operated by naval officials

Researchers with the institute explained that they intend to deploy an underwater vessel equipped with sonar-like acoustic positioning technologies, as well as a submersible drone to explore the depths of the site.

‘This government is doing something that is unprecedented,’ according to Colombia’s Culture Minister Juan David Correa, ‘exploring the sinking of the galleon as the possibility of understanding history and culture.’

The boat, dubbed the ‘holy grail’ of shipwrecks because of its abundant treasure, was heading back from the New World to the court of King Philip V of Spain when it plummeted to the bottom of the ocean.

The 62-gun galleon was sailing from Portobelo in Panama at the head of a treasure fleet of 14 merchant vessels and three Spanish warships when it encountered the British squadron near Barú.

The San Jose was a 62-gun galleon that went down on June 8, 1708, with 600 people on board

The San Jose was a 62-gun galleon that went down on June 8, 1708, with 600 people on board

The San Jose was a 62-gun galleon that went down on June 8, 1708, with 600 people on board

An intact Chinese dinner set and other crockery were amongst the ship's treasures

An intact Chinese dinner set and other crockery were amongst the ship's treasures

An intact Chinese dinner set and other crockery were amongst the ship’s treasures

In 2015, the Colombian government announced that a team of navy divers had discovered the legendary ship lying in nearly 3,100 feet of water.

Colombia announced the discovery of the San Jose that same year – but by that point, it had already caught the eye of adventurers.

Last year, another team brought back jaw-dropping images of its perfectly preserved cargo.

The Colombian government previously claimed that the ship would be raised before President Gustavo Petro ends his term of office in 2026.

However, there is set to be a grand fight over who owns the ship – with a US firm claiming that it discovered the vessel and is demanding a portion of the treasure.

The Spanish government and an indigenous group are also claiming ownership of the shipwreck.

Gold coins were also picked up on the video released by the Colombian government

Gold coins were also picked up on the video released by the Colombian government

Gold coins were also picked up on the video released by the Colombian government

Colombian Culture Minister Juan David Correa said the first attempt would be a 'dry run' for retrieving the rest of the treasure and the ship itself

Colombian Culture Minister Juan David Correa said the first attempt would be a 'dry run' for retrieving the rest of the treasure and the ship itself

Colombian Culture Minister Juan David Correa said the first attempt would be a ‘dry run’ for retrieving the rest of the treasure and the ship itself

The San Jose galleon was owned by the Spanish crown when it was sunk by the British Navy near Cartagena in 1708, and only 11 of its 600-strong crew survived

The San Jose galleon was owned by the Spanish crown when it was sunk by the British Navy near Cartagena in 1708, and only 11 of its 600-strong crew survived

The San Jose galleon was owned by the Spanish crown when it was sunk by the British Navy near Cartagena in 1708, and only 11 of its 600-strong crew survived

American research company Glocca Morra claims it found the San Jose in 1981 and turned the coordinates over to the Colombians on the condition it would receive half the fortune once the vessel was recovered. 

But the company’s claim was countered in 2015 by Colombia’s then-President Juan Manuel Santos, who said the Navy had found the boat at a different location on the seabed.

Glocca Morra, now called Sea Search Armada, is suing for half the treasure – around $10bn according to current estimates – under the US-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement, according to Bloomberg.

But the Colombian Minister of Culture Juan David Correa said the government’s team had visited the coordinates given by Sea Search Armada and found no trace of the San Jose.

Complicating matters further, there are competing claims from the Spanish – whose Navy the vessel belonged to – and Bolivia’s indigenous Qhara Qhara nation which says its people were forced to mine the gold and jewels, so the treasures belong to them.

Meanwhile, Colombia has hailed the find as a huge historic and cultural achievement.

Correa told Bloomberg: ‘This is one of the priorities for the Petro administration. The president has told us to pick up the pace.’

WHAT WAS THE SAN JOSE GALLEON AND WHY DID IT SINK? 

The San Jose was a 62-gun, three-masted galleon that went down on June 8, 1708, with 600 people on board

It was one of many Spanish galleons that made trips between Europe and the Americas between the 16th and 18th Century

When it sank, the San Jose was transporting plundered gold, silver, emeralds and other precious stones and metals from the Americans back to Spain

This wealth was helping finance Spain’s war of succession against Britain

The ship gained a reputation as the ‘holy grail’ of shipwrecks and was carrying one of the most valuable hauls of treasure ever lost at sea – worth around £12.6 billion ($17 billion)

It was found submerged off the coast of Baru in what is now Colombia, near the Rosario Islands by a team of international experts, the Colombian Navy and the country’s archaeology institute

Why did it sink?

The San Jose galleon was sailing from Portobelo, Panama as the flagship of a treasure fleet of 14 merchant vessels and three Spanish warships when it encountered a British squadron 

The San Jose was tracked down 16 miles (26km) off Cartagena, near Barú, by English Commodore Charles Wager from the Royal Navy on 8 June 1708

A fight ensued, known as ‘Wager’s Action’

Sources say that Wager initially planned to take control of the Spanish ship’s crew and cargo

However, the powder magazines on San Jose detonated, destroying the treasure-laden ship before it could be captured

Most of the 600 souls aboard perished when the vessel sank

The British prevented the Spanish fleet from transporting the gold and silver to Europe in order to fund further war efforts but the loot would have been vast if they had managed to capture the ship

 

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